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jenkinsbrynmair 

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Too many - but not nearly enough
So far, the UK has been able to deal with the incursions of the last 4 years.
We have the benefit of mainland Europe's experiences so we are not in the same place as France was in 2004.

There's no evidence that AH is adapting to colder climates.
That said, if the temperatures we've had in 2020 in southern England is the beginning of a trend, our climate will be very suitable for them.
:iagree: France's problem was (same as the USA with SHB) that they ignored the threat when it was first discovered instead of meeting it head on
 

hemo 

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No more to tell other than all the info in the group posts, I assume the question was jocular, just be aware of measures for the future. As they say, fore warned is fore armed, ignoring them won't make them go away. Being aware of solutions before the event is just sensible, as

See the map, red bits are known sightings, or this from a few years ago National Bee Unit confirm another sighting of the Vespa velutina Asian hornet in Woolacombe in Devon BBKA already on the case I believe.
The UK doesent have a real problem as yet, then neither did France in 2004, took 16 years to cover all of france and into spain (2010), portugal, belgium (2011). But then they let it get a hold, Uk seems to be trying to slow it but if they are there they will spread.
I have had them at my hives this year, leaves are falling from the trees and despite checking can't see a nest. Like I said I had 2-3/hr in summer and saw them because I put a camera on the hives otherwise I wouldn't have known unless by accident.

For those in the south of the UK worth just noting the measures to protect individual hives, like muzzles, so if they turn up you will remember this. Governments can't get rid of them all once established, just slow them down, all you can do is keep them away from the entrance so they don't pin them inside. Think it is technically called foraging paralysis.
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They so far haven't established over here as yet, though incursions have been dealt with. Please be more specific then spouting generic untruth's. Though primary & secondary nests have been found located in the last 3 / 4 years, as far as it is known no over wintered queens.
 

Apple 

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Long range forecast for Europe is a "Nuclear Winter" with extremes of low temperatures and cold winds direct from Siberia for long periods, hopefully the English Channel will not freeze over!
 

Gilberdyke John 

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So far, the UK has been able to deal with the incursions of the last 4 years.
We have the benefit of mainland Europe's experiences so we are not in the same place as France was in 2004.

There's no evidence that AH is adapting to colder climates.
That said, if the temperatures we've had in 2020 in southern England is the beginning of a trend, our climate will be very suitable for them.
Hope the effects of the next Maunder minimum arrive soon 🤞
 

charentejohn 

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Hemo said -They so far haven't established over here as yet, though incursions have been dealt with. Please be more specific then spouting generic untruth's. Though primary & secondary nests have been found located in the last 3 / 4 years, as far as it is known no over wintered queens.

I am not spouting and generic untruths, I am offering some advice on what to do when they establish which they will. Advanced warning will slow them but won't stop them, AH denial is not an option. Temperature does not bother them, they are slowed by it but exist in mountain regions too, if you think you have killed all that have arrived guess again.
I am not telling people the UK is infested but that the time will come when you will see them, and some measures to take. Feel free to ignore the advice.

You won't see them, I think the expectation is they will appear at hives and then be tracked home and the nest destroyed so no problem. In the countryside only 30% will be predating bees, and that if they are near some, the rest will be out and about eating wasps, butterflies etc as well as dead animals in the protein phase. If there are (as a wild example) 20 nests accross the south then seeing one is unlikely, when there are 500 nests then you will see them.
They are far from a bee only predator as some think as they feed on sugars taking nectar alongside bees until their grubs need protein so eat anything. Here we are starting to see european hornets at hives as the double AH/EH predation removes other prey.

You won't see any now as the queens will be hibernating, in March they will build tennis ball sized nests in hedges, you won't see them. Until August they will feed alongside bees on flowers while the main nest is built, you won't see them. After this the queens they are raising need meat so they forage for protein, you may see them but you will only be killing workers, by November if nest not found (can even be in the ground) the queens will look for sugars and the workers will die off the queens will hibernate.

I was just trying to be helpful but seems help is unwanted, no worries. I was just surprised the idea of someone bringing one to the Uk and dumping it was a serious consideration, the BBKA an others are not so laid back.
My guess is it will be many years before they are a real problem in southern england but they are unstoppable, just how insects are. Said all I need to say on this, remember me in 10yrs time.
 

manek 

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Thanks John, for the warning. It's appreciated.

The response you've received is probably because we've been on alert for the last few years, and we have had plenty of information about the threat that V. velutina poses.

In my BKA, for example, we've had trap making exercises, have an Asian Hornet Team and Co-ordinator (me), and disseminate information, eg news and research, about the insect and its life cycle to the membership.

I don't suppose my BKA is unusual in this, so you're addressing a better-informed audience that than your initial post presumes, which is why - I suspect - you got the response you did.
 

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