Apiary died over winter

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

pargyle 

Queen Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
12,370
Reaction score
2,419
Location
Fareham, Hampshire UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
6
Bruco is £5.40 cheaper for the same product.
Yes ... I'd go for that .. both do the same job. If you can reduce the cost of keeping bees I'm all in favour of it ... as I have enough Dipel to see out the rest of my beekeeping days it may be a time before I need more ....
 

F.F.Stung 

New Bee
Joined
Oct 8, 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
28
Number of Hives
2
I caught a swarm in June,2014. Never treated. At the moment they are packing in the pollen every day that is warm enough to fly. Sorry if I upset some treatment pushers.
 

Boston Bees 

Field Bee
Joined
Oct 13, 2020
Messages
683
Reaction score
622
Location
West Yorkshire
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
10-20
I caught a swarm in June,2014. Never treated. At the moment they are packing in the pollen every day that is warm enough to fly. Sorry if I upset some treatment pushers.
Interesting to hear. Do you let them swarm as many times as they wish to each year? Genuine question.
 

madasafish 

Queen Bee
Joined
Apr 10, 2010
Messages
9,577
Reaction score
869
Location
Stoke on Trent
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
8x Langstroth, a few Lang nucs,1x TBH, and about 17 mating mini nucs
I don't dispute treatment free is possible.

Treatment free and a reasonable honey crop? (reasonable = 50lbs/production colony in an average year.

When I ask that question, I usually get silence..
(Like the recent poster who claimed his bees were improving year by year but had no statistics so it was an "impression":poop: )
 

pargyle 

Queen Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
12,370
Reaction score
2,419
Location
Fareham, Hampshire UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
6
I don't dispute treatment free is possible.

Treatment free and a reasonable honey crop? (reasonable = 50lbs/production colony in an average year.

When I ask that question, I usually get silence..
(Like the recent poster who claimed his bees were improving year by year but had no statistics so it was an "impression":poop: )
It all depends.. I look at the average crop that beekeepers around me who are treating their bees get ... if I am round about where they are in crop size I'm happy... last year they mostly had a dreadful year and I did much better than them... theres more to crop size than being treatment free. Local forage, weather conditions at the right time ... how hard you manipulate for crop size all have a bearing. I would agree that big, healthy colonies will generally produce the maximum yield given other conditions but being treatment free does not necessarily mean your bees are weedy, infested and incapable... I know a few beekeepers who over treat their colonies that manage to get them into a state where they have difficulty surviving the beekeepers actions let alone manage varroa. Difficult to generalise to be honest...
 

Ian123 

Queen Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jun 20, 2018
Messages
3,071
Reaction score
723
Location
surrey
Hive Type
none
I caught a swarm in June,2014. Never treated. At the moment they are packing in the pollen every day that is warm enough to fly. Sorry if I upset some treatment pushers.
So you’ve caught a swarm that’s survived well done. Do you think the queen may bee an import that’s commercial available and bred for VSH.😉
It all depends.. I look at the average crop that beekeepers around me who are treating their bees get ... if I am round about where they are in crop size I'm happy... last year they mostly had a dreadful year and I did much better than them... theres more to crop size than being treatment free. Local forage, weather conditions at the right time ... how hard you manipulate for crop size all have a bearing. I would agree that big, healthy colonies will generally produce the maximum yield given other conditions but being treatment free does not necessarily mean your bees are weedy, infested and incapable... I know a few beekeepers who over treat their colonies that manage to get them into a state where they have difficulty surviving the beekeepers actions let alone manage varroa. Difficult to generalise to be honest...
100% agree but then you’ve been around long enough, are proactive and can get yourself out of trouble when needed.
 

Erichalfbee 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
21,066
Reaction score
2,855
Location
Ceredigion
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
7
So you’ve caught a swarm that’s survived well done. Do you think the queen may bee an import that’s commercial available and bred for VSH.😉
She’s doing remarkably well considering she may be emerged in 2013. A grand age. 😉
 

celtimar 

New Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
planet earth
Hive Type
none
How would signs of CBPV show during the winter , usually lots of dead and dying bees outside
as removed by healthy bees in summer , but in winter the bees are clustered and the virus would
spread easily due to close contact and the bees are not house keeping the same as in summer.
i assume you would end up with lots of dead bees on the floor under the cluster and as the cluster
size gets smaller the cold would finish them off . ? . Could also explain why it affected all the
hives due to spread of the virus between hives ? Just a thought
 
Last edited:

Erichalfbee 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
21,066
Reaction score
2,855
Location
Ceredigion
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
7
How would signs of CBPV show during the winter , usually lots of dead and dying bees outside
as removed by healthy bees in summer , but in winter the bees are clustered and the virus would
spread easily due to close contact and the bees are not house keeping the same as in summer.
i assume you would end up with lots of dead bees on the floor under the cluster and as the cluster
size gets smaller the cold would finish them off . ? . Could also explain why it affected all the
hives due to spread of the virus between hives ?
Just a thought
Is that likely?
I have unfortunately had CBPV twice .........6 years apart
In each case out of a number of colonies only one was affected.
They were both headed by queens of similar lineage though
 

celtimar 

New Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
planet earth
Hive Type
none
Was thinking more that the virus could transfer within the cluster as bees circulate throughout the cluster
for warmth and the movement over months of winter during warmer periods and movement to stores and brood rearing , cleansing flights. etc
Virus could be spread between colonies in summer /autumn due to robbing of smaller or weakened hives and drifting if colonies kept close within the apiary and cross contamination by movement of frames and even the hive tool during manipulation/ inspections and then spread within a weakened hive and perhaps Varoha would also play their part. Only the individual beekeeper will know what occurred during the season within their Apiary managment .
As i said it was just a thought as to what you could find in a dead hive in late winter early spring that was
affected by CBPV during winter as i assume some would be, what would inform a beekeeper to be aware that CBPV was a possible cause for the loss of their colony / colonies ?
 

Erichalfbee 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
21,066
Reaction score
2,855
Location
Ceredigion
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
7
Was thinking more that the virus could transfer within the cluster as bees circulate throughout the cluster
for warmth and the movement over months of winter during warmer periods and movement to stores and brood rearing , cleansing flights. etc
Virus could be spread between colonies in summer /autumn due to robbing of smaller or weakened hives and drifting if colonies kept close within the apiary and cross contamination by movement of frames and even the hive tool during manipulation/ inspections and then spread within a weakened hive and perhaps Varoha would also play their part. Only the individual beekeeper will know what occurred during the season within their Apiary managment .
As i said it was just a thought as to what you could find in a dead hive in late winter early spring that was
affected by CBPV during winter as i assume some would be, what would inform a beekeeper to be aware that CBPV was a possible cause for the loss of their colony / colonies ?
Why don’t you ask prof Evans.
He’s the expert.
ive only ever had it in summer. Some colonies do pull through summer infection and go on to survive the winter
I suppose you could look for black shiny bees though not all CBPV has those. Oh and K wing. That’s pretty standard.
 

F.F.Stung 

New Bee
Joined
Oct 8, 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
28
Number of Hives
2
Interesting to hear. Do you let them swarm as many times as they wish to each year? Genuine question.
No. I check for queen cells and break then down to two or three and do a Taranov.
This year I would like to split the Taranov and give the queenless split a swarm cell
 

Boston Bees 

Field Bee
Joined
Oct 13, 2020
Messages
683
Reaction score
622
Location
West Yorkshire
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
10-20
No. I check for queen cells and break then down to two or three and do a Taranov.
This year I would like to split the Taranov and give the queenless split a swarm cell
Thank you.

Taranov! I want to see one of those in real life one day. Looks dramatic.
 

HughMann 

House Bee
Joined
Jun 21, 2020
Messages
166
Reaction score
123
Location
Wales
Hive Type
14x12
I caught a swarm in June,2014. Never treated. At the moment they are packing in the pollen every day that is warm enough to fly. Sorry if I upset some treatment pushers.
shhhhhh
Don't let on that bees can survive on their own in trees without treatment, then survive in your hive without treatment. If people realize the truth in that, there won't be any money for breeders and other snake oil sellers............
Repeat after me - bees need humans and lots of money
 

Latest posts

Top