Wild pollinators out-gunned by honeybees

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madasafish 

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To be fair to M&S they do stock UK honey

the one referred to is Tesco.

I’m currently writing a paper which I hope will be published in the bee press on honey origin in the UK
KR
S
Be sure to tell readers that honey produced by imported queens is not real British Honey.
:devilish: :devilish:
 

Gilberdyke John 

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To be fair to M&S they do stock UK honey

the one referred to is Tesco.

I’m currently writing a paper which I hope will be published in the bee press on honey origin in the UK
KR
S
Having re-read the post I commented on I cannot see any reference to Tesco, just M & S is named.
 

madasafish 

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WTF ...!?

I hope you’re taking the pish

Shall I inform the Chinese couple who run our local chippy their fish and chips aren’t British ...?!
pish

Hence the emoticons
 

polymath 

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Google or look up on Youtube Professor Ratnieks, plant analysis. he has done a presentation on what pollinators prefer what plants. As you will see from the video and analysis different pollinators prefer different plants. Can their be a shortage sure, do bees cause a shortage highly questionable.
 

Finman 

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Google or look up on Youtube Professor Ratnieks, plant analysis. he has done a presentation on what pollinators prefer what plants. As you will see from the video and analysis different pollinators prefer different plants. Can their be a shortage sure, do bees cause a shortage highly questionable.
And who believes that fairytale?

.
 

Antipodes 

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Here in Australia we are clearing land of trees at an absolutely astonishing rate, and have been doing so solidly since European settlement, which wasn't that long ago. It's amazing to think how long the trees were here, and now, so many gone in just a couple of hundred years. It's unreal. Victoria is the most cleared state, but Queensland is bad now. Most of the honey and pollen here comes from our flowering trees of course.
 

drdrday 

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I'm not going to comment either way on honeybees pushing out other pollinators - that's for other scientists to test.
However, to me the answer is rather insignificant either way when so many people are just covering their gardens with astroturf or block paving. Surely every other property down my road having a fully paved or fake turfed front garden (and goodness knows what's left of the back garden) is a threat of a far greater magnitude to other pollinators than my couple of hives. I can count on one hand, with fingers to spare, how many grass lawns I can see from my office window :mad:
 

madasafish 

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I'm not going to comment either way on honeybees pushing out other pollinators - that's for other scientists to test.
However, to me the answer is rather insignificant either way when so many people are just covering their gardens with astroturf or block paving. Surely every other property down my road having a fully paved or fake turfed front garden (and goodness knows what's left of the back garden) is a threat of a far greater magnitude to other pollinators than my couple of hives. I can count on one hand, with fingers to spare, how many grass lawns I can see from my office window :mad:

Not to mention those with roses and other plants that attract aphids and are smothered with insecticides..

This debate reminds me of the "How many angels can balance of the end of a needle?" debate of medieval times.#
Lots of irrelevant opinions as the problems lie elsewhere.

# I am old enough to remember it well...
 

victor meldrew 

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Not to mention those with roses and other plants that attract aphids and are smothered with insecticides..

This debate reminds me of the "How many angels can balance of the end of a needle?" debate of medieval times.#
Lots of irrelevant opinions as the problems lie elsewhere.

# I am old enough to remember it well...
Lots of plants aren’t much use to honeybees but useful to other pollinators ,
bumblebees utilise many many flowers inaccessible to honeybees . .
the blame for the decline lies elsewhere in my opinion!
 

Pembroke 

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Some research for you:
Just an observation the chart seems to have a lot of different varieties of Lavandula (Lavender) flowers in it I count 13. No idea if this would skew the results by having a type of plant that 'seems' on cursory inspection of the chart to favour bumblebees?
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Just an observation the chart seems to have a lot of different varieties of Lavandula (Lavender) flowers in it I count 13. No idea if this would skew the results by having a type of plant that 'seems' on cursory inspection of the chart to favour bumblebees?
Tell that to my bees!
 

Finman 

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Lots of plants aren’t much use to honeybees but useful to other pollinators ,
bumblebees utilise many many flowers inaccessible to honeybees . .
the blame for the decline lies elsewhere in my opinion!
And if a bumbblebees do not have nose long enough, they can bite a hole throught the flower tube. And if there are nectar, bees take nectar via same hole. There are lots of these flowers. Perhaps same species but millions of flowers in the forest.

A bumbblebee sits onto the flower and at the same moment it has made the hole.
 
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