How long to wait before introducing mated queen

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Lisbanoe

New Bee
Joined
Oct 13, 2022
Messages
16
Reaction score
8
Location
armagh
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
11
I received two mated queens in the post yesterday. Because of the weather I could only make up the nucs they’re supposed to go in today. How soon can I introduce the queens. I have introduction cages.
 
Ah that would have been really handy to know earlier 😂 I’ll pop them in tomorrow and knock down any emergency cells in a few days. Thanks for that.
 
get them in as soon as possible but don't take the tabs off the candy, wait another day then go back in again, check for any QCs and then break the tabs if the bees are pretty placid
 
Perfect, thanks!

I was going to move them to my out apiary. But I only set it up about 3 weeks ago and I’m not sure about it yet. Someone kept bees there years ago and I don’t know why they stopped. I was worried about foul brood. But there’s probably 100 reasons. The current owner doesn’t know. I put a nuc there and it’s moved to a full hive now. It has nice healthy capped brood. At what stage could I be confident of putting more hives there? Or is it a how long is a piece of string question?
 
If the current colony is healthy and doing well, no reason why you can't introduce more.
When you make up your nucs, try to use sealed/emerging brood frames and avoid combs with too many young larvae and eggs as it reduces their opportunity to raise emergency cells, they may even raise more after she is released if they have the chance.
Depending on the bees, you may also need to keep an eye on her first laying cycle as some can be quite determined to do their own thing by superseding her.
 
If the current colony is healthy and doing well, no reason why you can't introduce more.
When you make up your nucs, try to use sealed/emerging brood frames and avoid combs with too many young larvae and eggs as it reduces their opportunity to raise emergency cells, they may even raise more after she is released if they have the chance.
Depending on the bees, you may also need to keep an eye on her first laying cycle as some can be quite determined to do their own thing by superseding her.
Thank you, I'd already selected mostly emerging brood in case I needed to use the queen introduction cage thankfully. I'll definitely keep an eye on the queen cells, I've had a couple earlier in the year that were thinking of supercedure before the queen's first batch emerged. Give her a chance! Thankfully they didn't go through with it once the cells were knocked back. They're keeping me on my toes.
 
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