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Why won't they stay local?

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Jordy 

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As a newbie to the hobby I read & researched everything I could to the point of adding even more 'bee desirable' flowers & shrubs to my already well-stocked garden. However, whilst these blossoms are constantly full of visiting bumble bees, my honey bees completly ignore these offerings & head off into the blue yonder to who knows where & back all day long. Why won't they stay local? Does anyone know enough about a bees psyche?
 

Ade'sBee's 

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where i have one of my hives there are many flowers six foot away but they are also heading to the blue yonder ( beans in field about 1 mile away ) better forage bee-smillie
 

Firegazer 

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Me too.

We have loads of honeysuckle, lilac, loads of nectar and pollen plants everywhere, and only bumblebees.

My bees shove off into the woods somewhere and ignore the lot.

FG
 

Midland Beek 

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I am sure there are papers on this subject filed away somewhere, each containing loads of mathematical equations. Perhaps it is more wise for us humans not to understand bee foraging behaviour?
 

oliver90owner 

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Possibly something to do with numbers of flowers to visit while avoiding returning to 'used' flowers too soon. Bees seem to avoid large concentrations of foraging bees absolutely adjacent to their accommodation (attracting unwanted attention?).

'Effective foraging' is the key and the bees know best (well, better than me). Me? I worry more whether they are getting sufficient for their needs (and a bit spare for me!) than what they are foraging on, unless a major flow.

Regards, RAB
 

susbees 

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Bees seem to avoid large concentrations of foraging bees absolutely adjacent to their accommodation (attracting unwanted attention?).

/QUOTE]

Logically, the quality of forage locally in late autumn through to mid-Spring is perhaps more important. If you believe Weiler, and seems logical, bees only fly a smallish radius of the hive at such times (500yds?)....fitting with "large concentrations" as there are fewer then anyhow and the chances of freezing to death greater.

So get those snowdrops, crocuses and autumn asters in :).
 

thedeaddiplomat 

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sadly, no more!
Didn't someon once say something about the grass always being greener...?
 
T

Tom Bick 

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And it is possible that when you do see bees on flowers in your garden they are perhaps not your bees.
 

Somerford 

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The other thing to take into account is the fact that bees will only visit flowers when they secrete nectar, which happens at different times of the day, and at varying intervals. Apparently, Cotoneaster bushes have a nectar 'release' every 15 minutes which accounts for the number of bees on them and the huge number of berries they produce too.

Some plants only secrete in the morning, and others pm. Also, some, while attractive to bumblebees, are no use for honey bees due to the depth of the nectar source (they simply can't reach it)

regards

S
 

sunshinemedic 

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Thers is a lavender bush a few feet from my hive that is attracting bees from my neighbour's apiary. Mine just fly straight past!

I'll never understand women and how they shop!:smilielol5::smilielol5::confused:
 

Jordy 

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this is black magic area mate, this is verging on the men understanding women minds,

you would be better of trying to sort out the question to the answer to life the universe and every thing
Hahaha! Nice one.......with you on that!!
 

Jordy 

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Cheers fellas(and fellasses?).........Some good replies & I'm happy knowing it's not just me then!! Enjoy the season & let's hope the sun comes out again.
 

Cazza 

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The other thing to take into account is the fact that bees will only visit flowers when they secrete nectar, which happens at different times of the day, and at varying intervals.
regards

S
Anyone have any good references regarding this. I would really enjoy reading more about nectar release times.
Ta
Cazza
 

davethegas 

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thedeaddiplomat

the bees ain't daft, they know the grass isn't greener, just mowed a bit different (lol)
 

PaleoPerson 

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We have a line of Bullace trees that run past the hives at home, they completely ignored the trees nearest the hive starting about two feet away, but covered all of the others at about 40 feet plus.
 

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