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Where is the larvae?

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shadowsa 

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I been looking for this answer here and seems like nobody talks about it or i don`t know how to find it.
here it goes,

Where is the larvae in the nest actually located? are they below the honey? or in the honey? or where exactly? nobody explains it exactly how it is and i don`t own a bee hive. or is the honey separately stored from the larvae? and the bees go for the honey and feed the larvae? i really don`t understand this i actually never thought about asking that in biology class but well now that i don`t have that opportunity anymore i thought i come here and ask you guys. Thank you in advance it would be super much appreciated to get an exact answer, and if it is here somewhere posted already and you know about it please let me know where it is because i could not find it.

ah yes and one more thing, is the comb actually eatable? is it made of honey too?
thanks again
 
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kazmcc 

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Hi Shadow. The comb is made from beeswax and is edible ( an acquired taste I'm told ) although I like it

The the bees usually lay the eggs/ which turn to larva in the central part of the frame, with a band of pollen stores , then a band of honey, some capped, in the shape of a rainbow or arch.

The brown covered cappings contain larva once capped by the bees to pupate, the whitish caps contain honey at the top edges.

I am a beginner and that is how I think it goes......I may be wrong on one or two points but someone else will be along to correct me if needed.
 
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Here's another shot of a frame. The oval in the centre is sealed brood, i.e. underneath the cappings (which look like little ginger biscuits) are the pupa from which adult bees will emerge in a week or so. The brood is normally in the lowest level in a conventional hive but honey can also be stored in the frames at the ends.

The pale patches in the corners are sealed honey, there is also unsealed honey in the cells in this region as well. Frames above this one in the hive would normally be filled with honey and have no brood.

And I personally don't like comb but it won't poison you. If I eat honey in the comb the wax is spat out afterwards!

There is also a queen cell in the bottom left hand corner of this frame.

 
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kazmcc 

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Here's another shot of a frame. The oval in the centre is sealed brood, i.e. underneath the cappings (which look like little ginger biscuits) are the pupa from which adult bees will emerge in a week or so. The brood is normally in the lowest level in a conventional hive but honey can also be stored in the frames at the ends.

The pale patches in the corners are sealed honey, there is also unsealed honey in the cells in this region as well. Frames above this one in the hive would normally be filled with honey and have no brood.

And I personally don't like comb but it won't poison you. If I eat honey in the comb the wax is spat out afterwards!

There is also a queen cell in the bottom left hand corner of this frame.

Much clearer pic Rooftops. I don't have any of our own combs yet so had to google to find that image. Our pics still have bees all over them lol.
 

shadowsa 

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Thank you all very much, for the answer that bothered for ages, not to know if actually the possibility to have larvae in the honey is given or not. so i guess that means it is possible but unlikely if i get this right.
 

drstitson 

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another pic

Here is a late season brood frame (upside down) - you can see the brown capped sealed brood in centre and 2 arcs of honey towards the bottom of the picture (top of frame). you can also see some cells of upcapped brood with white shiny larvae visible.

following that is a super frame which is mostly capped honey with a little residual sealed brood (which will be filled with honey once last bees emerge).
 
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Beautiful pics...thanks for sharing!
 

kazmcc 

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Thank you all very much, for the answer that bothered for ages, not to know if actually the possibility to have larvae in the honey is given or not. so i guess that means it is possible but unlikely if i get this right.
Hi. The bees lay their eggs into cells that the bees clean before the queen will lay into them. The eggs stand upright ( I think ) at first, then after a few days the eggs fall to their sides and hatch into larva. The larva curl up into the shiney white C shapes you can see in the above pictures. They do not lay them into honey, the larva they intend to become queens are surrounded by royal jelly, which the female worker bees produce with a gland on their heads ( am I right? ) I am new so I may not have all my facts correct, but I don't think they surround normal worker or drone ( male ) brood with jelly.

Could someone correct me if I am wrong please ( I'm sure you will lol )

;)
 

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