What's flowering as forage in your area

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Around Saint John's Day, the stamens of the chestnut tree begin to emerge, and the foxgloves are already completely open.
 
Glorious smell this morning taking the dog for an early walk - Lime in full flower at last
There's a monster mature Lime 100 yards away, there's so many flowers the tree is more yellow than green!
Are there bees on the limes? There's an avenue of 10 limes beside my apiary (not in flower yet, but maybe with the warmer weather forecast for next week) but in previous years the bees have shown variable interest - certainly no audible buzz. I'm never sure whether I get a lime honey crop.
 
Forage in short supply around here. My neighbour has just mown down either side of the bridleway taking out large tracts of cow parsley and bramble. Annoying but it is his land. At lease there are some places fairly near that still have a good crop of both although the cow parsley is starting to go over. I think at least two weeks until our avenue of limes could flower.
 

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I want to plant a specimen tree with a good shaped crown in my garden about 50 feet from my house. It has to be bee friendly. The garden is in the country lots of mature planting around it. What can you recommend please?
 
I want to plant a specimen tree with a good shaped crown in my garden about 50 feet from my house. It has to be bee friendly. The garden is in the country lots of mature planting around it. What can you recommend please?
So many options.

My current favourite is medlar, of which I am growing a handful of varieties. Lovely shaped tree, with bee friendly blossoms and interesting fruit. Nice autumn colours to boot.

A cherry of some sort is always a winner. But to the extent that fighting birds for cherries is a faf, you could go with an ornamental variety, just being careful to get one with a simple blossom, to be bee friendly.

I am also growing a few Korean Evodia (Tetradium Daniellii) trees, to hopefully plant a grove of them. . They flower mid summer, are maybe the most interesting option for bees. They are also very attractive in their own right.
 
Are there bees on the limes? There's an avenue of 10 limes beside my apiary (not in flower yet, but maybe with the warmer weather forecast for next week) but in previous years the bees have shown variable interest - certainly no audible buzz. I'm never sure whether I get a lime honey crop.
Look at the trees as early as you can in the morning I’ve been noticing lime pollen in the morning and then not so much in the afternoon
 
With the passing of the shortest day down here, and the wattle blossoms out, hope springs eternal for the new season.
 

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With the passing of the shortest day down here, and the wattle blossoms out, hope springs eternal for the new season.
Curious, here on point
On the opposite side of the planet, acacias do not bloom until early February, which is about 40 days late compared to the species' original date.
Effect of insularity or simply climate difference?
 
Curious, here on point
On the opposite side of the planet, acacias do not bloom until early February, which is about 40 days late compared to the species' original date.
Effect of insularity or simply climate difference?
There are so many different ones. First cab off the rank is the Cootamundra. Yet to flower are the silver, the black and then the coast wattle, the blackwood (acacia melanoxylon, that's the one that produces the magnificent timber) and so on. All up, they flower for months on end. Here is a list.

https://worldwidewattle.com/infogal....php?continent=Australia&area=Tasmania&sect=y
 
There are so many different ones. First cab off the rank is the Cootamundra. Yet to flower are the silver, the black and then the coast wattle, the blackwood (acacia melanoxylon, that's the one that produces the magnificent timber) and so on. All up, they flower for months on end. Here is a list.

https://worldwidewattle.com/infogal....php?continent=Australia&area=Tasmania&sect=y
The most common species in Galicia are dealbata, melanoxylum and longifolia.
https://www.researchgate.net/public..._Tercer_y_Cuarto_Inventario_Forestal_Nacional.
 
The most common species in Galicia are dealbata, melanoxylum and longifolia.
https://www.researchgate.net/public..._Tercer_y_Cuarto_Inventario_Forestal_Nacional.
I see. They are the ones I would have guessed. We call the dealbata "Silver Wattle" (beautiful coloured timber) , the melanoxylon "Blackwood" (renowned timber) and longifolia "Coast Wattle". I've got the silver wattle and coast wattle in my home garden. The first photo is the current state of the flower buds on the Coast Wattle and the second the buds on the Silver Wattle. The Silver will be the next to flower.
 

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I see. They are the ones I would have guessed. We call the dealbata "Silver Wattle" (beautiful coloured timber) , the melanoxylon "Blackwood" (renowned timber) and longifolia "Coast Wattle". I've got the silver wattle and coast wattle in my home garden. The first photo is the current state of the flower buds on the Coast Wattle and the second the buds on the Silver Wattle. The Silver will be the next to flower.
Perhaps it is the oldest specimen of acacia in Galicia.
https://www.monumentaltrees.com/es/esp/galicia/vilaboa/4582_castineiras/
On the list you can also find several specimens of eucalyptus and even other non-native species such as (camellias, sequoias, cedars, etc.).
 
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