What's flowering as forage in your area

  • Thread starter Curly green fingers
  • Start date
Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
small leaved limes along our driveway at the start of July
Lime in full lower in London, but not a bee on it on Saturday; too breezy, too cool, way too early. In Surrey the bell heather is showing flowers; only a few, mind, and not enough to interest insects, but again, too breezy, too cool, too early.
 
Not sure, Dodge, but showers will wash nectar from the upturned flowers, and although bees were on it yesterday, I've seen plenty of flowering bramble without.
Some of my colonies are rhn8ng out of stores with Brambles out a flowering. Terrible weather in Solihull.
 
Hopefully 18c or 19c ambient with some sun, less rain and double figure overnight temps get everything going.

I really hope the wet weather with some warm weather gives nice humid conditions with the Lime and the season recovers.
 
Last edited:
There is a great deal of comment from around the country about what is and isn't flowering ,in particular the state of brambles . However I have been surprised about the lack of discussion about one of our main potential crops - clover. Where I have my apiary in Somerset there is generally a reasonable flow from clover but this year not only is there no flow but fields which by now are white there don't even seem to be any plants. The field which is usually a good spot was not actually under water was pretty waterlogged for much of the winter. I do wonder if the lack of this little plant is due to its roots being rotted by the prolonged waterlogging as we have found with germination of many vegetable and garden plants. If the season doesn't pick up pretty damn quick I can see a sharp drop in beekeepers next year either through frustration or loss of so many colonies. I think that the gradual build up of stocks of sugar for autumn feeding might be a good idea to spread the cost as I feel the bees are going to need a huge amount of TLC if things continue to work against us. Any comment............?
 
Was down in Salisbury earlier in the week...masses of bramble open along the river in the city...not one bee on any of it. Back in my apiary, the bramble all have tightly closed buds, nothing for the bees.
 
There is a great deal of comment from around the country about what is and isn't flowering ,in particular the state of brambles . However I have been surprised about the lack of discussion about one of our main potential crops - clover. Where I have my apiary in Somerset there is generally a reasonable flow from clover but this year not only is there no flow but fields which by now are white there don't even seem to be any plants. The field which is usually a good spot was not actually under water was pretty waterlogged for much of the winter. I do wonder if the lack of this little plant is due to its roots being rotted by the prolonged waterlogging as we have found with germination of many vegetable and garden plants. If the season doesn't pick up pretty damn quick I can see a sharp drop in beekeepers next year either through frustration or loss of so many colonies. I think that the gradual build up of stocks of sugar for autumn feeding might be a good idea to spread the cost as I feel the bees are going to need a huge amount of TLC if things continue to work against us. Any comment............?
We had a long bank of white clover adjacent to the apiary. Very happy bees. However all the plants have now gone and been replaced with tall grass. After last winter/ this spring not sure there is any rationale for attempting to resurrect the clover. Colonies seem to have sufficient forage to survive but not to start filling any supers yet. Hopes pinned on a harvest from the lime avenue.
 
I have three self seeded mulleins growing against my fence... no idea where the seeds came from I've never seen mullein anywhere in the vicinity until these three appeared. Spotted a mullein moth caterpillar on one of them today... isn't nature wonderful... provide the habitat and the dependent species appear! Hope the Robin doesn't find it ...

Clearly enjoying the mullein equivalent of McDonald's judging by the holes !
 

Attachments

  • 20240615_153931.jpg
    20240615_153931.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 1
  • 20240615_154856.jpg
    20240615_154856.jpg
    2.8 MB · Views: 0
Last edited:
I have three self seeded mulleins growing against my fence... no idea where the seeds came from I've never seen mullein anywhere in the vicinity until these three appeared. Spotted a mullein moth caterpillar on one of them today... isn't nature wonderful... provide the habitat and the dependent species appear! Hope the Robin doesn't find it ...

Clearly enjoying the mullein equivalent of McDonald's judging by the holes !
Snap
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1862.jpeg
    IMG_1862.jpeg
    890.6 KB · Views: 0
Back
Top