What tree?

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Silly me I I have a Rowan tree fully berried in my garden 🤣🤣
 
We also have one in the garden, but at the moment it has neither berries nor even leaves. The weather clearly messed it up completely this year.

James
 
We also have one in the garden, but at the moment it has neither berries nor even leaves. The weather clearly messed it up completely this year.

James
We have a few. They are stripped of berries as soon as they are ripe.
 
We also have one in the garden, but at the moment it has neither berries nor even leaves. The weather clearly messed it up completely this year.

James
Ours are covered in berries weighing down branches in London SE15 & SE16, had full on drought all through summer too
 
I thought fig leaves were lobed or palmate, but not all of them it seems. I still favour Aspen as an identification though.

James
 
“There are three main ways to identify an aspen tree.
The first is by its leaves. Aspen leaves are small and oval-shaped with sharply pointed tips. They are also arranged in pairs on the stem, unlike most other trees which have leaves that alternate along the stem.

The second way to identify an aspen tree is by its bark.
Aspen bark is very smooth and white, often with a greenish tinge. It is also very thin, so you can often see the tree’s inner layer of bark through the outer layer.

The third way to identify an aspen tree is by its branches.
Aspens have very slender branches that are often curved or drooping. The ends of the branches are also often covered in small buds.”
 

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