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What should I do with my wax?

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bobba 

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Obviously, it can be sold as it is or can be processed into candles etc.

I am aware some web sites do a wax exchange for foundation.

In terms of financial return vs faff what do you lot feel is the best thing to do?

thanks.
 

Apple 

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Whatever you do please do not flush the Q tips down the toilet.
My Grandmother said you should not put anything smaller than your elbow in your ears.
Chons da
 
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Clean beeswax is a valuable commodity .... you don't get much of a return for it exchanging it for foundation...

You should be looking for at least £1 an ounce ... I sell 1 oz beeswax blocks to fellow woodturners for £1.50 ... which if my maths is good ...£24 a lb. More if I cut it with Carnuba to make turning sticks.

Thornes current price £2.25/Kg... £1.63 a lb. to buy outright or £3.50/kg credit against purchases.

If you can make candles .... even simple moulded ones... you should be achieving somewhere in the order of £3.00 /oz .. perhaps £3.50/oz with a bit of decent packaging and nice clean wax for the finished product.

Polish is easy to make ... 2 oz tin .. £4.50 of anyone's money.

Depends what you value your time at.
 

bobba 

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Great info ,thanks as always pargyle.

I have some unprocessed wax and was wondering if I should process it for exchange, but seeing that's not very economical I will wait until can get a solar extractor up and running next year. (I have seen pics of your one in another thread :) )

I have herd it mentioned a few times that candles are a waste of time, and making cosmetics/therapeutics gives the greatest return, tough are probably the most faff too.

I am going to do my own research but thanks for the head start.
 

Pembroke 

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You need clean cappings wax for cosmetics or food wraps.
Our association makes food wraps, although I think they may be a passing fad that's almost had it's day as there's loads of companies jumping on the band wagon.

Cosmetics, be very careful if you intend to sell them. Here in the UK you need to get them tested before you can legally sell them although most don't seem to bother and just rely on their product liability insurance if something goes wrong. As with honey there are legal label requirements.

 
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Our association makes food wraps, although I think they may be a passing fad that's almost had it's day as there's loads of companies jumping on the band wagon.

Cosmetics, be very careful if you intend to sell them. Here in the UK you need to get them tested before you can legally sell them although most don't seem to bother and just rely on their product liability insurance if something goes wrong. As with honey there are legal label requirements.

And unfortunately, if someone does react badly to a cosmetic or anything that is applied to the skin and the product has not been tested then your insurance company will scream blue murder and the chances of a payout will be remote. Insurers will always find any way possible to legitimately avoid payment of a claim or at least mitigate their exposure. If it is something serious that has occurred you could lose your shirt.

I totally agree that anything to do with cosmetics, unless you are going for it properly and are prepared to jump through all the hoops.... is not worth the effort. Plenty of other ways of making wax pay its way without the grief.
 

bobba 

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I kept my wax in two batches (one batch from each ear). One lot is pure capping, the other lot contains everything else.

I figured cosmetics/therapeutics would be a legislation mine field. But hoped things would be a bit more relaxed for a hand cream or bit of lip balm.

My wife has a friend that makes and sells hand cream and a few other bits on a small scale. As far as I know she does it all above board. So it must be possible to navigate the regulations. I should probably talk to her.

But if I have to start paying for insurance and certification, than it could quickly become uneconomical anyway.

I agree the wraps could be a fad. I think a lot of people will buy them once to try. Going near the oven with wax will just end with me getting in trouble anyway.

I am leaning towards just doing some tea-light candles, maybe some scented ones. I think that will provide me with a reasonable faff:return in the short term.

Thanks as always.
 

Biodlaren 

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This is interesting to me.
This sentence: "I am aware some web sites do a wax exchange for foundation." is saying me that this isn't any common practice.
In Sweden we have well established routines for circulating wax. I just leave my frames with old black combs, have them melted and cleaned and get foundation in return. And it isn't even expensive. I have tried to melt and clean my frames my self but I know what pain in the ... that is. I gladly pay 5 SEK (~0,5€) per frame and get them back as good as new.
 

Nige.Coll 

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Traded mine in and paid the wiring fee. Got back 1400 sheets of foundation.
 

bobba 

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This is interesting to me.
This sentence: "I am aware some web sites do a wax exchange for foundation." is saying me that this isn't any common practice.
In Sweden we have well established routines for circulating wax. I just leave my frames with old black combs, have them melted and cleaned and get foundation in return. And it isn't even expensive. I have tried to melt and clean my frames my self but I know what pain in the ... that is. I gladly pay 5 SEK (~0,5€) per frame and get them back as good as new.
It is widely known about and common practice.

I mentioned it in such a way, partly to make clear I know about it, and because I was particularly interested in comparing it economically to the other options.
 

madasafish 

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I wanted to know the answer too so am glad you relied.

Thats alot, roughly how big is 100 lbs of wax once rendered?

Think the size of a1kg bag of sugar x 50
 

Nige.Coll 

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A 5 inch layer in a 30lb honey bucket is around 10- 12 lbs I think. It was quite a pile.

I had a look at the receipt.
I got 1200 sheets of premier grade super foundation and 120 sheets of brood for around 100lbs of wax.
Paid around £257 for wiring fee + other charges.

Cost if purchased.
120 packs of premier super foundation = £1,014
12 packs of premier brood foundation = £165
Total if bought ( without discounts ) = £1179
So the wax was worth around £922
 
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