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Goran 

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11C today, sunny. Yesterday simmilar. Yesterday dismantle another one colony I expected to go. One such still expect to go, and think that will be all.
Yesterday we were picking raspberries.. So much about a climate.. Also violets, snowdrops and primula blooming, bees bringing hazel pollen..
It was great day for walking, our kid enjoyed in play with bunch of cats and dogs on sunny hill. We enjoyed watching.. Today we go for reprise..
 

ugcheleuce 

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I repeat again, day length and height of sun in the sky tells them all they want to know, i.e., it's winter so leave us in peace.
I have my doubts about this theory. Here's why:

The bees that are in the hive right now, were born in October. From their perspective, days right now are about 30% shorter than when they were born. But: that is almost exactly the same for bees born in July (days are about 30% shorter in October than in July). If the length of day is a marker of winter for the bees, why don't the July bees think it's winter in October?

As for the height of the sun, we'd have to know whether bees measure it from the horizon or from straight above, but if we assume they measure it from the horizon, then: the angle of the sun is halved between October and now... but the angle is also halved between July and October.

I think it far more likely that bees know it is winter simply because of the temperatures.
 

derekm 

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I have my doubts about this theory. Here's why:

The bees that are in the hive right now, were born in October. From their perspective, days right now are about 30% shorter than when they were born. But: that is almost exactly the same for bees born in July (days are about 30% shorter in October than in July). If the length of day is a marker of winter for the bees, why don't the July bees think it's winter in October?

As for the height of the sun, we'd have to know whether bees measure it from the horizon or from straight above, but if we assume they measure it from the horizon, then: the angle of the sun is halved between October and now... but the angle is also halved between July and October.

I think it far more likely that bees know it is winter simply because of the temperatures.
you made an assumption that it is the magnitude of the delta height over a fixed period.
Temperatures are useless in a temperate maritime climate. If the bees can detect when the second derivative with respect to time of the Suns highest elevation is zero then they can detect solstices. I.e when the suns height changes from getting lower to getting higher .
 

Finman 

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No need to invent own theories. You just read what others have found out.

Shortening day inform to all nature, what is ahead. Bees are not only which react on that.

First sign in bees, that autumn is coming is that they stop drone rearing and kill drones. Even before that they have given up from swarming.

When we look lenghtening day, our bees act like all other bees. They start to rear small amount of brood in cluster. Even if we have coldest month going, -20C, they start brood rearing.

We have had too bee strains, which do not react properly daylength. They rear brood with wrong timing, and they will die very soon.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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I mentioned length of day. Now maybe you'd like to point out where I mentioned anything about brood. Talk was about winter and opening hives to check for brood due to obsessing over mite drop and counting and you are the one who is constantly banging on about it and posting such advice for beginners.
I repeat again, day length and height of sun in the sky tells them all they want to know, ie, it's winter so leave us in peace. ( note yet again I said nothing of brood )

Take a look at the National weather forecast from time to time, you'll be amazed to find the rest of this country gets different weather, something worth considering before giving out such poor advice.
:iagree: :iagree:
 

Millet 

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+7 here today and its been raining for 2 days solid, I had a listen to the side of the insulated hive but heard nothing, I then had a listen with the stethoscope and I could hear a nice steady humming sound from the front and rear of the hive.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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I have my doubts about this theory. Here's why:

The bees that are in the hive right now, were born in October. From their perspective, days right now are about 30% shorter than when they were born. But: that is almost exactly the same for bees born in July (days are about 30% shorter in October than in July). If the length of day is a marker of winter for the bees, why don't the July bees think it's winter in October?

As for the height of the sun, we'd have to know whether bees measure it from the horizon or from straight above, but if we assume they measure it from the horizon, then: the angle of the sun is halved between October and now... but the angle is also halved between July and October.

I think it far more likely that bees know it is winter simply because of the temperatures.
And I have serious doubts about yours - apart from the obvious fact that it would be doubtful that any July bees are still alive in October. why talk about relative values, the fact it there's a helluva lot less light around now than in July and a heck of a lot more dark - do you not think that the bees would notice that there's a heck of a lot less foraging times between two sunrises?

Here, on June 21st we had 16 hours and 40 minutes day whilst yesterday we had only 7 hours and 49 minutes.
So I think it is far more likely that bees know it's winter by the amount of time they spend in the dark.
They may take full advantage of any good weather they get, but together with the fact there is a lot less forage out there, there's going to be a lot less time to find and gather it, also, regardless of the fact that some will bang on about the weather being the same as midsummer - days take longer to warm up and get substantially colder sooner in the evenings.
 

chrismcd 

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Bees flying on Boxing Day!

Went out at 2.00 to check that the roofs were still on.

Two hives were out and about - one really quite busy (10-15 bees coming back every minute). Heavens knows what they were up to, but they looked like they had been foraging.

It may be no coincidence that it is the only hive that seems to have plentiful stores.

I think I will need to keep an eye on their fondant levels if they keep this up.
 

BrianO 

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Went out at 2.00 to check that the roofs were still on.

Two hives were out and about - one really quite busy (10-15 bees coming back every minute). Heavens knows what they were up to, but they looked like they had been foraging.

It may be no coincidence that it is the only hive that seems to have plentiful stores.

I think I will need to keep an eye on their fondant levels if they keep this up.

Still some forage out there, Viburnum in prolific flower Mahonia, and more. All the bees need is the correct conditions.

Some on here will definitively say no forage out there , no nectar.
Was watching bees foraging on Viburnum in sun couple weeks ago first week December.

Bees will show that although some think they know all here, and will definitively state there point of view believing they are always right, we collectively do not know all !

So much .... For All... Still to learn !
 

philipm 

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Noticed yesterday a cherry tree in full bloom in a neighbours garden,Also there are loads of gorse bushes covered with flowers this year.Put it down to the crazy weather.
 

Erichalfbee 

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Noticed yesterday a cherry tree in full bloom in a neighbours garden

There are winter blooming cherries
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Still some forage out there, Viburnum in prolific flower Mahonia, and more. All the bees need is the correct conditions.

Some on here will definitively say no forage out there , no nectar.
Was watching bees foraging on Viburnum in sun couple weeks ago first week December.

Bees will show that although some think they know all here, and will definitively state there point of view believing they are always right, we collectively do not know all !

So much .... For All... Still to learn !
Let us know how much honey you take off come March :D
 

dlawr42103 

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All of my hives are busy, looks more like spring than winter... They are bringing in a lot of yellow pollen which I think might be mustard as I saw a field of it a couple of miles away.
 
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All of my hives are busy, looks more like spring than winter... They are bringing in a lot of yellow pollen which I think might be mustard as I saw a field of it a couple of miles away.
That could be Winter flowering oil~seed Rape:icon_204-2:

BUT loads of Daffodils in flower on the banks of the
semi subtropical great grey green greasy Tamar river all set about with second homes.

depressing isn't it!

:sorry:

Nadelik lowen
 

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