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margob99 

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Can anyone help me identify this tree? I've lived with it in my garden for several years without having a clue as to what it is; am curious to know and to know if it's bee-friendly

Thank you!
 

margob99 

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Thank you! I think a Sorbus definitely, although not sure if it's the Common Whitebeam, because the leaves are not toothed and the flowers not quite the same as the images I've googled for Common Whitebeam.

But definitely a Sorbus of some kind.

Thank you very much; you've solved a longstanding mystery :)
 

Grub 

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Hi all
Good feeling its cotoneaster frigidus.They diffrence to what you have mentioned it is semi evergreen so holds most of it leaves in winter the one you metioned looses all its leaves
Cream flowers now, red berries winter I have one 20 feet tall 5 foot away from my hive loved by bumble bees and not one of my bees on it !!!
Rich pickings around here
Grub
 

Skyhook 

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Definitely Cotoneaster, quite likely frigidus. Suprised your bees don't like it, maybeb they're spoiled for choice!
 

MuswellMetro 

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Bees normally do not forage within 15m of their own hive . any bees you see on it will be from elsewhere. i think it is problable a defencesive istinct not to betray the position of their hive

only time i have seen bees feed close by is in spring when it is cold. mine pick up pussy willow in short dashes from Tree to hive
 
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nonstandard 

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Cotoneaster of sorts possibly Waterii definitely not sorbus aria (whitebeam).

As for bee fodder I can't tell you about that, sorry.
 

susbees 

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I agree...not whitebeam. Cotoneasters here are covered in bumbles and wasps (grrrrr). Honey bees are elsewhere...clover, brambles, buddleia globosa, etc.
 

iball 

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It might be a Viburnam. If it is a cotoneaster then the colour of the berries will confirm, yellow = frigidus and red = watreii, according to my wife's plant book.

Ian
 

margob99 

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This is definitely a tree, not a shrub. Clusters of white ball-shaped flowers that don't end up looking like flowers or blossoms. Leaves remain during winter. Leaf fall heavy in all 4 seasons. Red berries, not yellow.

Cotoneaster watereri? No, leaves of that one are too long and thin.

Cotoneaster frigidari? Maybe; are the leaves leathery and grey, slightly furred underneath?

Mine definitely holds its leaves in winter, so it could be ...

I don't think it's a viburnum.
 

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