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thorn

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Leeds council has identified the park opposite my home as a potential site for woodland planting. It's proposing a mixture of taller and shrubbier species.
I intend to respond to the notification and will suggest trees that are valuable to bees (I'm doing this for the greater good, not self-interest, you understand and will mention other pollinators).
Blackthorn will be on my list. What else do you think I could realistically suggest?
 

Swarm

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Leeds council has identified the park opposite my home as a potential site for woodland planting. It's proposing a mixture of taller and shrubbier species.
I intend to respond to the notification and will suggest trees that are valuable to bees (I'm doing this for the greater good, not self-interest, you understand and will mention other pollinators).
Blackthorn will be on my list. What else do you think I could realistically suggest?
That's fantastic news, let's hope we hear more of this. All the obvious choices have been mentioned already but there are a variety of Cotoneasters to choose from.
 

Erichalfbee

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Guelder Rose, Alder Buckthorn
Both are shrubby and have berries for the birds. The Buckthorn is in flower for months and you see fruit and blossom on it simultaneously later in the season. It’s the food plant of the Brimstone butterfly. The same butterfly hibernates in Holly which is great for pollinators too
 

Wilco

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I'd suggest checking the soil type and how dry/wet the area is first. It's really important to plant species which are appropriate for the area as well as being good for pollinators. There is no point planting lots of trees that don't do well.

Emphasize that there needs to be undergrowth to provide a properly diverse species habitat and ideally people and dogs should not be able to enter parts to reduce perturbation of birds/mammals.

If the soil suits, don't forget oaks.
 

jenkinsbrynmair

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Too many - but not nearly enough
there are a variety of Cotoneasters to choose from.
but they are frowned upon for woodland planting schemes as they are non native vigorous growers that can easily take over and smother indigenous ground cover. They are fine as long as they are in enclosed, controlled growing areas.
 

madasafish

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Horse chestnut
Sweet chestnut
Willow
Hazelnut
 
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Leeds council has identified the park opposite my home as a potential site for woodland planting. It's proposing a mixture of taller and shrubbier species.
I intend to respond to the notification and will suggest trees that are valuable to bees (I'm doing this for the greater good, not self-interest, you understand and will mention other pollinators).
Blackthorn will be on my list. What else do you think I could realistically suggest?
Looking at NHMS results the most valuable are sycamore, willow, horse chestnut, cherry, bird cherry
 

Redcap

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Ceanothus attracts lots of attention from the bees when in flower.
 

JamezF

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Isn't it toxic to horses?
Bees like the flowers though

No idea about horses, but yes, bees do seem to like the flowers. Especially bumble bees. It spreads like crazy though, and grows so fast that it outcompetes many other species.

James
 
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You could also try to persuade them that the underbrush should be left to it's own devices as much as possible. So more wildflower meadow, or natural woodland clearings and glades rather than neat tended monoculture grass, leave the brambles to grow, etc.
 

Gilberdyke John

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You could also try to persuade them that the underbrush should be left to it's own devices as much as possible. So more wildflower meadow, or natural woodland clearings and glades rather than neat tended monoculture grass, leave the brambles to grow, etc.
Leaving brambles to grow is ok for some spots you're certain you won't need again. Clearing them out later without access by machinery is 'osswork! 😭
They did serve a purpose some while ago near Thorne in concealing a dumped corpse for years. The body might still be undiscovered if the brambles hadn't been cleared.
 

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