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Treating stings!

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Floss 

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I am curious - in the event of a sting do any of you have any "treatment" to hand ie herbal, antihistamine etc etc and if so what?

I wondered whether it may be an idea to have something "just in case" esp for visitors, children, chickens (!) although I am sure my bees will be very polite and patient with all!

I read that in USA they recommend bee keepers have epipens in case of anaphylaxsis. Is that usual here?

Many thanks

Floss
 

jimbeekeeper 

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Hi FLoss
Quite a bit of info here http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=214&highlight=epipen&page=3

But as for the epipen, they are very hard to get hold of, don’t have a long shelf life, and you will probably do more harm to the person than the bee sting ever would have.

Remember than more people die in the Uk from being stuck by lightning than any kind of Uk animal bite/sting!

A mobile phone is best for any worst case reactions.

Other than that some simple over the counter anti histamine cream
 
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Finno 

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Safety should be considered - I find that multiple stings on the fingers are of no consequence, but then I don't seem to have much reaction. However, multiple stings around the neck and head could have serious results if you swell up. I have always found that one can get widely variable responses from hives, even those I would regard as docile, dependant on the weather, population size, queen rightness, conflict with other colonies due to robbing, time of year etc. etc. So I have a personal rule to always wear full protection except for my fingers.
 

FROGDOGDIVER 

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I have really bad hayfever so during the summer always take antihistamine tabs anyway so if stung this helps. As a precaution though I spoke to my GP to ask for an epipen purely for my own use. After a discussion he agreed as my bees are in a rural location some way up a field and a good way away from medical help. I keep them in my bee box with me when I do my inspections. I have never had a bad reaction to a sting so far (touch wood) but fellow beekeepers have had bad reactions even though they never had before so as I said always good as a precaution as anaphalaxia can come on almost instantly and can be fatal.

My GP also recommended one for my 6 yr old who helps me with the bees. It is an epipen Jnr but for the same reasons and the fact that Andrew has started having hayfever symptoms last summer. I now carry a strip of antihistamines in the car and will now keep a bottle of piriton syrup in the glove box for the kids as Lewis my 2 yr old got stung on the face on sunday. We were not at my bees but out when a honey bee just darted him. I got the sting out quick. So from now on ill keep piriton in the car.

Like Baden Powell himself once said "Be Prepared"
 

itsahabit 

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Some good info and advice here:
http://www.cheshire-bka.co.uk/Articles/AnaphylacticShock.php

Be reassured that severe reactions to bee stings are very rare, much rarer than reactions to wasp for example.
If you do suffer swelling or itching from bee stings then antihistamines will help reduce the reaction but they take some time to work their way through your system. If you know you have a problem take them prophylactically to get the best results. It is also a good idea to seek advice on the best types as some of the most readily available ones (used for hayfever) don't work so well on itchy skin. Beware of antihistamine creams if you have eczema as sometimes they can make itching worse!
 
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I use hc45 cream as I get a cup sized (approx) itchy swelling at the sting site usually for about 3 days. I have a tube in my bee stuff box so I can get some on as soon as possible as the itching is worse on the first day and the sooner you can get some on the better.

Frisbee
 

Heather 

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For less severe scenarios - ice cube, ice cube, ice cube- the third one in your vodka!!
 

gavin 

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Be reassured that severe reactions to bee stings are very rare, much rarer than reactions to wasp for example.
Among members of the public, yes, but not amongst beekeepers and their families. I've been desensitised to bee venom and in the group being treated we were about 1:1 wasps:bees (with an occasional cat!).

The wasp folk were all members of the public whereas the bee folk were all beekeepers or members of their family (and I think in one case a council worker who'd been exposed to bees in trees). I think everyone under treatment had an anaphylactic reaction before they were referred.

Systemic reactions to bee stings are not rare amongst beekeepers and relatives, so folk ought to have a plan if the worst happens.

best wishes

Gavin
 

planbee 

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A bee sting gives me considerable irritation for 3 weeks, over a very large area, and the swelling lasts for about five weeks.

I also have to have twice the anaesthetic at the Dentist, before there is any effect.

When having antibiotics, I "jump through the hoops", and take the course, as prescribed, but knowing that it won't work, and that I'll end up back at the surgery next week, to get another, double dose.

That means I get a triple dose for each treatment.

Yesterday, having re-started beekeeping, I had my first Citrizine Hypochloride tablet, the second a few minutes ago, and that treatment will continue until the bees stop flying later in the year.

But no Ana-wotsit though, but thank goodness for the mobile phone, just in case.

I presume you all know that if you dial 112 instead of 999 on a mob, the services can triangulate your position?

Handy when we hide hives, and us, in out of the way places.

John
 

Floss 

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Thank you for all your replies, that is really helpful - seems like I need to have some additions to my bee box!

Very useful tips there!

Floss
 

admin 

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Planbee thats a great tip,I never new that,it must of crossed loads of members minds at some point regards "how the hell will I give my position on a mobile if I need urgent help" when miles from home stuck in a field.
 

planbee 

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Another "useful fact" knocked on the head, then!

Information given in good faith, and it was given to me in good faith, as far as I know.

John
 

DulwichGnome 

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Its an urban myth unfortunately. There is no difference between 112 and 999 in terms of how the call is routed to the emergency services.

http://www2.bt.com/btPortal/applica...emid=list/999_112_emergency_services_faqs.xml

112 is a good habit to get into using though, as it works anywhere in europe I believe.
Yes they are handled the same way but....

"How do you know where I am when I make a 999 call?

Landline name and address information is passed to the Emergency Operator at the time of the call. For mobile calls your approximate location details are based on an Ordnance Survey map reference system from mobile network information."

Mike.
 

andynorton 

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Yes they are handled the same way but....

"How do you know where I am when I make a 999 call?

Landline name and address information is passed to the Emergency Operator at the time of the call. For mobile calls your approximate location details are based on an Ordnance Survey map reference system from mobile network information."

Mike.
Indeed, your approximate position is passed on, but I think this only gives the location and radius of the cell you are currently connected to, which could be several square miles. Its certainly of assistance to the emergency operators, but I wouldn't bank on it being accurate enough to let anyone find you quickly in the middle of nowhere!
You can see how this technology works by downloading google mobile to your phone and getting it to show your current position.
http://www.google.com/intl/en_uk/mobile/

I think that google mobile will find your position with more accuracy than the information the emergency services will receive though, as it works on the signal strength from a number of cells (if available) to narrow the position down a bit.
Anyway - apologies, I've taken this right off topic! :)
 

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