Quantcast

Treating a swarm

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

Black Comb 

Queen Bee
Joined
Aug 10, 2009
Messages
2,737
Reaction score
0
Location
Cumbria
Hive Type
other
Number of Hives
10+
What are your thoughts on treating all swarms collected?

With oxalic acid as there is no brood to kill.

If so, when is the best time to do this?

Looking forward to some good advice.
 

the naked beekeeper 

Field Bee
Joined
Nov 9, 2008
Messages
742
Reaction score
0
Location
S.E. Cornwall
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Enough
If bees have swarmed then they will have had to be in at least a good enough condition to do that.

If you are concerned then, use a drawer in an OMF and work out how 'bad' they are that way.
 

Haughton Honey 

Drone Bee
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
1,237
Reaction score
0
Location
South Cheshire
Hive Type
commercial
Number of Hives
Lots of Commercial hives.......
Assuming that they will be drawing fresh comb then the main burden will have been left behind when they swarmed (i.e. mites in the brood).

ApiGuard treatment to knock any mites directly off the bees might be more appropriate than Oxalic if the mean temperatures are above 15c
 

Rosti 

Drone Bee
Joined
Jul 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Reaction score
0
Location
North Yorks, UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
4
I only have the experience of capturing one swarm (2009 via a bait hive). In that instance the advice I followed was to treat with oxalic as soon as I could while there was no brood and hence a good chance of effective treatment. The colony built strongly and quickly after treatment and showed minimal mite drop by autumn.

Treatment comes with a degree of risk so I guess your answer is:
If the swarm will be isolated from your other hives (and by definition is a bonus colony) monitor and treat if required. If the swarm will immediately become part of your core stock, treat first, check later.

I have laid 2 baits hives this year, both remote to my apiary. I will treat with oxalic before there is brood and before I move them to the apairy.
 

Rosti 

Drone Bee
Joined
Jul 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Reaction score
0
Location
North Yorks, UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
4
Can place as a defencive stragegy at / close to apiary site (and I have done that as well). But with regard the original question of treatment you are still left with a decision on whether you know the providence of the bees swarm that has arrived. If you do you can decide on treatment tactics with that in mind. If you dont then I think I would always treat while I did not have brood.

Going into winter you effectively attempt to treat with minimal brood present to maximise effect. A broodless swarm is the ultimate opportunity for an effective dose. As previously posted I would balance the risks, how important is the swarm to me /how disappointed would I be if the treatment caused the loss of the queen / colony
 

Midland Beek 

Drone Bee
Joined
Oct 18, 2009
Messages
1,969
Reaction score
0
Location
South Staffs
Hive Type
none
With oxalic acid as there is no brood to kill.
Not sure what you are on about, but oxalic acid in sugar syrup dribble does not kill brood.

Lactic acid in water is the correct way to treat bees which are broodless, and that includes a swarm.

Trickling oxalic acid is something you do during winter and when the bees are clustering. Gets all over bees, kills mites type of thing.
 
Last edited:

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,516
Reaction score
21
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
Is it normal practice to keep a bait hive near your apiary should the worst happen?

Bait hives at the edge of your own hives catch your neighbours bees attreacted by bee pheromnes from your apiary, to catch the swarms from your own hives then the bait hive needs to be about 250 yds away -
 

grizzly 

Drone Bee
Joined
Nov 9, 2008
Messages
1,106
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
6
Why not spray them with thymol syrup mix. Not as harsh as oxalic can be.
 

Rosti 

Drone Bee
Joined
Jul 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Reaction score
0
Location
North Yorks, UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
4
Bait hives at the edge of your own hives catch your neighbours bees attreacted by bee pheromnes from your apiary, to catch the swarms from your own hives then the bait hive needs to be about 250 yds away -
Nice summary, have mine placed 300m away simply because I had access to that location, thought natural instinct would be to attempt to move away from their origin, didn't think about the dynamics of defending 'your' swarm against 'attracting' another.
 

Latest posts

Top