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Black Comb 

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I'm wondering when is the best time to remove this now it's geting warmer?
 

Poly Hive 

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Would it not make more sense to leave it on? They do like being cosy you know.

Mine have it on all year round.

PH
 

VEG 

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As I have not used insulation, would it keep the hive cooler in summer due to the sun on the roof warming the hive?
 

victor meldrew 

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Insulation works both ways :)
I keep insulation on all year round, Thornes used to sell what they described as high tech insulation ,with one black and one reflecting surface, idea being to have reflecting side down in Winter and reflecting side uppermost in Summer :).

John Wilkinson
 

Finman 

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Now the hive needs most insulation. It is cold and bees keep heat for brood.

I cannot understand what good is in that if you do not use insulation.

I have same roofs and same inslation all year around.
 

Finman 

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As I have not used insulation, would it keep the hive cooler in summer due to the sun on the roof warming the hive?
Folks think sunny hot days. What about rainy weeks and nights? And long chilly spring.
 

Brosville 

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Well.......... if you were running Warré hives, there's an inbuilt "quilt" that helps the bees regulate the internal heat and atmosphere all year round - and to use our homes as an analogy, I can't see the point in removing the insulation come summer - as has been said, it helps all year! :)
 

Finman 

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I'm wondering when is the best time to remove this now it's geting warmer?
When I use in spring electrict bottom heating , day temp +17C is a limit when bees start to ventilate extra heat away. Then by night temp may be +5C.

I shoud put a timer that heaters are on only at night.

As far as I see you day temps are hardly 10C. Sometimes higher but not much and not long time.
 

ENZO 

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Hi, all my hives have built in insulated roofs and on OMF, they stay like this all year round, I believe the insulation allows the bees to regulate the inside temperature the way they want it with the least influence from the outside temp.
This time of year, heat is needed for the brood expansion until the numbers build up.

All The Best, Enzo.
 

Sue 

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Insulation

Hi all

I'm new to the forum. It looks excellent.

What are people using for insulation?

Sue
 

darrenperrett 

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Hi Sue,

Welcome to the forum. I`m using 2" Celotex which is OTT but it`s what I had around after some building work.

Darren.
 

SER 

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Hi Sue.

I have multilayer silver foil-felt-silver foil... roof insulation on the underside of the roof all year round and currently have the spare space around the fondant in a small eke packed with fibreglass type insulation.

Si.
 

ENZO 

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Hi Sue, welcome,
I use Kingspan (similar to Celotex), the insulation they use in new houses, it comes in 2" which is what I use, and has foil on both sides so the bees don't chew it. It's normally free as off cuts on building sites.

You can use polystyrene sheets but it cannot be in contact with the bees as they just chew holes in it.

It definately helps to keep the bees warm this time of year.

All the Best, Enzo.
 
Last edited:

oliver90owner 

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Top insulation for winter - yes,yes,yes.

Top insulation for summer - why? I leave ventilation in/over the crownboard and the bees propolise it closed. If they needed it they would leave it open; that means there is little air-change above the crownboard. The heat that is conducted through the wood roof heats the air layer which is a very good insulant so virtually no heat travels downwards; if anything the hot air will escape from the roof vents due to small amounts of air leaking through gaps from below. So absolutely no problem in most situations during the summer. But if it is there, leaving it should not be a cause for concern. Just like a polyhive!

Regards, RAB
 

Finman 

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Top insulation for winter - yes,yes,yes.

Top insulation for summer - why?
In the hive temp is something over 30C. Outside you have at night 10-15C.
By day something. Often not much.

Honey get crystallized in supers because they are cold.

What does it help if you take insulation away?

I have upper entrances but I do not keep them open in supers. I have found that bees do not store honey near entrances because the the place is too cold.

What are roof vents?

.

.
 
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oliver90owner 

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Finman,

I agree.

My reply did say if it is on, no need to remove it. But what I was trying to counter was the need to keep the hive cool. With a crownboard (with no ventilation), an air gap and the roof materials plus the warmth from the brood I doubt that so much 'needed' thermal energy is lost from my hives during the summer in the UK. Most of mine have a sheet of polystyrene jammed in the National or Dartington roof, with more added for the winter.

Regards, RAB
 

m100 

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When I use in spring electrict bottom heating , day temp +17C is a limit when bees start to ventilate extra heat away. Then by night temp may be +5C.

I shoud put a timer that heaters are on only at night.

As far as I see you day temps are hardly 10C. Sometimes higher but not much and not long time.
The average temperature in 'Central England' is around 9deg C, given that a bee can often become immobile at anything less than 15 deg C its a wonder any bees can exist over here. It's only flying that keeps them warm enough to fly.
 

Finman 

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Finman,

But what I was trying to counter was the need to keep the hive cool.
Bees reguate themself the hive.

When the hive is too hot? Have you in UK much temps whic are over 30C by day? In sunshine the temp goes over the brood area temp.

The hive is most hot when the nectar flow is huge. The evaporation of water from nectar needs energy but it keeps the hive cool.

We had about 5 years ago very hot summer. I keep all upper entrances open. In many hives the queen moved to lay to the uppermost box.

So i noticed that it is not me who knows the need of ventilation in hives.
 

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