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DRam 

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I made a batch of thymol solution following the instructions from the Norfolk Honey Company


The solution that I didn't use on the day I stored in an air tight jar. This was about 2 weeks ago, when I went to use it tonight it has a thick crust on the solution.

Is this normal? Is it still safe to use? If this isn't normal, what could have I done wrong?

Thanks in advance.
 

Swarm 

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Don't know his recipe but the thymol emulsion recipe posted here will often solidify, put the jar in some hot water for a while.
 

DRam 

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Thanks, that's helpful to know. I wondered if I'd done something wrong, I'll try that.
Cheers.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Is this normal? Is it still safe to use?
Yes and yes - Thymol doesn't dissolve in water only alcohol so will separate and crystalise on top, there's no way of stopping that..
It lasts for years, just forms a crust, leave the jar in near boling water for five milutes and it liquefies again. I've just notice this week that the three year old lecithin I have is starting to go clarty so, rather than waste it I've made up loads of 1lb jars of thymol emulsion for future use, I've over a gallon of it so should last a season or two :D
 

hemo 

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Made up a new thymol batch this week, last batch was a good few years old.
 

The Poot in Somerset 

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How necessary is adding thymol to syrup?
How often have you found syrup going mouldy in your experience?
 

hemo 

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I have had syrup go mouldy in the feeder before but as mentioned the thymol has other advantages.
 
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How necessary is adding thymol to syrup?
How often have you found syrup going mouldy in your experience?
Never in 5 seasons so far.. And also no cases of nosemia either.

I don't use it, if you feed in the autumn and there's a good ivy flow... Surely the syrup would be mixed with ivy honey why would you need to add thymol.. I know nosemia.. But is there not less chance of nosemia when colonys have more of there own natural resources than substitutes??
I would love to know if there's any data to support or not support this.

Another question probably unanswered :(
 

The Poot in Somerset 

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Never in 5 seasons so far.. And also no cases of nosemia either.

I don't use it, if you feed in the autumn and there's a good ivy flow... Surely the syrup would be mixed with ivy honey why would you need to add thymol.. I know nosemia.. But is there not less chance of nosemia when colonys have more of there own natural resources than substitutes??
I would love to know if there's any data to support or not support this.

Another question probably unanswered :(
Thanks All,
I’ve not used it and not had mould or nosema issues either.
Also, like you, Curly I leave honey on the hives and only feed minimal amounts of syrup.

Is there a suggestion that colonies only fed on fondant (and thus no thymol additive) suffer from nosema more than those getting the thymol?
 

The Poot in Somerset 

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It’s not to stop it going mouldy
It’s to help prevent nosema.
In the video from NHC, Stewart repeatedly states its to stop mould and says there’s no evidence it prevents nosema.
Do you know of any sources where this has been studied or is it beekeeping folk lore?
 

Erichalfbee 

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In the video from NHC, Stewart repeatedly states its to stop mould and says there’s no evidence it prevents nosema.
Do you know of any sources where this has been studied or is it beekeeping folk lore?
No I don’t have any studies.
Any reports I have are anecdotal.
Quite a few beekeeping practices originate thus. I’m pretty sure beekeepers started using OAV before any peer reviewed research showed its effectiveness.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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In the video from NHC, Stewart repeatedly states its to stop mould and says there’s no evidence it prevents nosema.
Do you know of any sources where this has been studied or is it beekeeping folk lore?
quite a few studies on the web, the one that comes readily to mind was the three year study conducted by the universities of Eig and Thrace in Turkey around 2005
 

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Murox 

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How do we separate the authentic from the spurious?
There are a number of 'oils' reportedly of use to bees. Oregano and Tea tree oil, citronella, geranium, lemongrass, lavender, eucalyptus, and peppermint, for example have all been sighted (and most if not all tested) for their useful antibacterial & antifungal properties.

I did find this - its about essential oils in beekeeping.
 

The Poot in Somerset 

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quite a few studies on the web, the one that comes readily to mind was the three year study conducted by the universities of Eig and Thrace in Turkey around 2005
Thanks both,
I’ll do some reading.
(Jenks, I’m seriously impressed that the above study came “readily to mind”).
Randy Oliver recommends it above marketed products it seems.
Thanks both of you for your advice, help and attention on this forum.👍
 

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"Thymol treated syrup appears to be promising in the control of nosema infection."

But of course I use thymol purely to prevent mould ( which it seems to - unthymolated syrup seems to get black bits in it very quickly). After all this is what I pay my BBKA fees for and this is what our president has said: Thymol
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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How do we separate the authentic from the spurious?
There are a number of 'oils' reportedly of use to bees. Oregano and Tea tree oil, citronella, geranium, lemongrass, lavender, eucalyptus, and peppermint, for example have all been sighted (and most if not all tested) for their useful antibacterial & antifungal properties.

I did find this - its about essential oils in beekeeping.
yes, but really speaking Thymol isn't really an essential oil
 

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