Quantcast

The Walking Drone.

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
6,214
Reaction score
0
Location
Norwich
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3 National Hives & 1 Observation Hive.(Indoors) & lots of empty boxes..
When the drones get kicked out, why do they walk? I have seen one or two receiving what appears to be a nibble before they are kicked off and seen a couple with the tips of thier wings frayed, but the others I have examined have wings that look ok and the bee is getting away from the hive at as rapid a speed as it can thro the grass, so therefore (to me) appears to ok, although unwanted.
 

susbees 

Queen Bee
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
3,233
Reaction score
0
Location
Welsh Marches, by Montgomery
Hive Type
commercial
Number of Hives
35ish
What I don't understand is if a drone is indeed welcome and will be accommodated in any hive they don't leg it once their friends start being kicked out and try and move in elsewhere...hive still rearing a queen, another bee type in another apiary with differing calendars etc...
 
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
6,214
Reaction score
0
Location
Norwich
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3 National Hives & 1 Observation Hive.(Indoors) & lots of empty boxes..
Mine just scramble thro the grass as far as the paving stones and then run around in circles trying to get off the paving stone...
 

Hivemaker. 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
14,310
Reaction score
8
Location
Exmoor.
Hive Type
national
The drones are weak as the bee's have stopped feeding them....
 

drstitson 

Queen Bee
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Messages
7,657
Reaction score
0
Location
surrey, lincolnshire etc.
Hive Type
dadant
Number of Hives
14
dead men walking

agree with Hivemaker - if the colony doesn't feel the need for drones anymore then presumably stop caring for them. Think of them as having been shafted by a nasty divorce case.

Perhaps if we fed them up they might mount little fathers for justice protests on hive roofs!!!!
 

djg 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 9, 2010
Messages
287
Reaction score
0
Location
London SE1
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
85
You got to admire the boisterous drones charging around with their great manes! Although mine are still tolerated "indoors", it always strikes me at this time of year that, by definition, every drone you see is a biological failure, by virtue of still being alive!
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,632
Reaction score
35
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
by definition, every drone you see is a biological failure, by virtue of still being alive!

Not necessarily all of them. Some may be needed yet!

Regards, RAB
 

drstitson 

Queen Bee
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Messages
7,657
Reaction score
0
Location
surrey, lincolnshire etc.
Hive Type
dadant
Number of Hives
14
now there's a challenge...

ok. if we are to accept that Drones are not necessarily redundant at this time of year, here's a question:

what is the latest that you've had a new princess who has hatched, successfully mated and gone on to produce a viable colony that overwintered ok.

obviously some extra details would help. nuc vs full brood box. supercedure or queenless hive given fresh eggs to work on etc etc.
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,632
Reaction score
35
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
what is the latest that you've had a new princess who has hatched, successfully mated and gone on to produce a viable colony that overwintered ok.

Supercedure is no problem. Very late, as long as there are drones available and the old queen is laying beside the new one. My answer is I can't remember.

Those with many multiples of 'my number of colonies' might have details, but I would not be surprised if it were so late that regular inspections were finished, so it could easily pass unnoticed.

RAB
 

drstitson 

Queen Bee
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Messages
7,657
Reaction score
0
Location
surrey, lincolnshire etc.
Hive Type
dadant
Number of Hives
14
that's cheating!

supercedure - having an old queen to keep the colony "topped up" whilst waiting the 3 weeks for princess to hatch and then the week or two to get laying properly. In this case it's not really any different to the original colony carrying on ISQ.

what us newbies will be interested to hear is how late can a new queen rescue a queenless colony with waning population of bees in order to produce an adequate number of winter bees to enable (as sure as possible) survival.
 

Latest posts

Top