TBH build

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steve56616 

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I have been in the process of building a TBH. I have been looking through the threads but cant find what I'm looking for so I'm positing to ask the question.

How is the best way to make strips on the bars if I haven't got a router?
I thought of doweling type moldings sold in B&Q the small square type but open to suggestions
 
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A table saw with the follower removed will cut a slot to fill with wax... or do a bit of whittling to form a triangular bar... search TBH on the internet.. one US site has loads of info!!
Great fun.. every apiary should have a TBH as a drone supplier!!
Nos da
 

steve56616 

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A table saw with the follower removed will cut a slot to fill with wax... or do a bit of whittling to form a triangular bar... search TBH on the internet.. one US site has loads of info!!
Great fun.. every apiary should have a TBH as a drone supplier!!
Nos da
I haven't got a table saw either.
I was going to buy a TBH but then decided to make one with spare timber I had. Not sure if im going to like it or if it's just going to be a pain having both the national and a top bar. Maybe I will like it and move over to them...got to try and see. So far so good with the build. Just roof and bars to do now
 

Fritillary 

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I get on best with a strip of dowelling pinned on, as you suggest - have tried various shapes - and a trail of melted wax dripped along the lowest edge/curve, or starter strips of wax.
 

pargyle 

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I haven't got a table saw either.
I was going to buy a TBH but then decided to make one with spare timber I had. Not sure if im going to like it or if it's just going to be a pain having both the national and a top bar. Maybe I will like it and move over to them...got to try and see. So far so good with the build. Just roof and bars to do now
I find that a triangular strip painted with beeswax works best but I've also used a saw cut with a dribble of melted beeswax, a small strip of foundation about an inch deep attached the the underside of the top bar and a strip of square timber about 3mm square attached to the top bar and painted with beeswax - they all work to encourage the bees to build comb vertically down from the top bar. The only thing I've found with the triangular strip is that with it they seem to attach the comb very substantially to it and the top bar as well... but any port in a storm and if you don't have a table saw or band saw then your options are limited to other methods.

If you are worried about mixing nationals and TBH then make your TBH a Tanzanian TBH with vertical sides and make it the size of a national frame - indeed, you could then put some frame landings in it and use national frames in it but run them foundationless ... look up Dartington Hive in the internet.
 

steve56616 

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Thanks for the comments. I will try and get the triangular strip as that was what I was wondering if one made stronger attachment of comb than another.
 

madasafish 

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Triangular strips work best.

I cut them down the diagonal of a square section.. using a jigsaw.. wood held diagonally in a Workmate.. Made several hundred that way.
Bees don't mind different heights, slight wavy lines or rough wood. indeed I use scrap wood wherever possible. Attach with PU glue and two small nails.
Rub with a block of wax.. one pass will do..

Strips of wax etc are overkill, too muck work and less strong..
 

bpmurray 

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Th***es sell the bars for around £17 for 10 if you don't fancy doing them yourself.
 

derekm 

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Triangular strips work best.

I cut them down the diagonal of a square section.. using a jigsaw.. wood held diagonally in a Workmate.. Made several hundred that way.
Bees don't mind different heights, slight wavy lines or rough wood. indeed I use scrap wood wherever possible. Attach with PU glue and two small nails.
Rub with a block of wax.. one pass will do..

Strips of wax etc are overkill, too muck work and less strong..
just how effective are the triangular bits ? what size are they ? I have a research project that might need the info
 

madasafish 

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just how effective are the triangular bits ? what size are they ? I have a research project that might need the info
hmm Varies..

From about 10mm wide /5mm high to 5/3. Bees don't care.

Of a 17 inch wide bar, triangular strip covers middle 12 inches.

Very effective. Only one case of cross combing in six years..(bane of TBH keepers).
 

drex 

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I use 5x5 MM. square, virtually same length as top bar. Coat the downward face with wax. Usually no problem with cross combing either, but usually drawn out between two already drawn combs. Think it matters little to the bees apart from the initial hint. My warre uses a wax filled groove.
 

crmauch 

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I have been in the process of building a TBH. I have been looking through the threads but cant find what I'm looking for so I'm positing to ask the question.

How is the best way to make strips on the bars if I haven't got a router?
I thought of doweling type moldings sold in B&Q the small square type but open to suggestions
I won't claim this is the best, but I think it's slightly better than just dribbling wax. Cotton string either dipped in beeswax or the wax dribbled over the string, placed down the center of the top bar.

If you want to see someone doing it, McCartney Taylor on the YouTube Channel "OutofaBlueSky" has a two part video.
 

Itchy 

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I'm trying coffee stirrers dipped in wax as my guides for top bars (national frames)
 

John R 

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Top Bar Idea

I have my own way, each bar is made by taking two lengths of square timber, around 1 inch x 17 inches long, I then sandwich a strip of cut unwired foundation between the 2 pieces, total depth of 1.75 inches so that I have about 3/4 of an inch hanging below the bar for the bees to build on along the length, allowing a bit of bee space on the ends where it meets the TBH sides. I then nail the 2 pieces of wood together through the sides to get a firm grip of the foundation.

This works every time in terms of straight combs, and the strength of the foundation being trapped between the 2 pieces of wood means I never get a comb collapse in the hive.

I can get a photo of this if anyone may be interested.

If you go into a timber or builders yard they will have lots of spare bits of wood to make bars out of, they often have them between timber planks as spacers and they are just binned. You don't have to have a perfect size of width or depth, the bees can work it out.

Good luck whatever you do.
 

Motobiman 

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I have been in the process of building a TBH. I have been looking through the threads but cant find what I'm looking for so I'm positing to ask the question.

How is the best way to make strips on the bars if I haven't got a router?
I thought of doweling type moldings sold in B&Q the small square type but open to suggestions
Tape two saw blades together to cut the groove . . . . . and make a simple jig to hold them then heat them in the oven to 100 degrees and melt strips of foundation in.

In our assocation apirary we tried foundation strips, triangular bits with wax melted on and grooves with wax melted in and the bees used them all, the first is the easiest and cleanest. IMHO
 
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