Storing supers over winter without wax moth destroying them

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The Riviera Kid 

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Which is the best way to store supers over the winter? I am planning on putting mine in the loft but don’t know the best way to stop wax moth getting at them.

I have extracted my honey now and put the supers back on under the brood box with the queen excluder in between for the bees to lick the comb clean. Last night I took them off again and the frames are “dry” and there is basically little trace of honey left on them (though there is some dark pollen).

I’ve heard of people freezing frames and scorching the supers inside with a blowtorch. Does this work? How long do frames need to be frozen for?

I’ve also read about chemicals that can be used by putting a small amount on each sheet of news paper between two supers but would like to avoid this if possible as all sources say that the chemicals produce noxious fumes and this may not be best given that they will be in the loft.

Any suggestions appreciated.
 

MJBee 

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I store mine in stacks of 6 with all seams masking taped , an empty brood box on top and two sulphur strips burnt in that every month. No problem with wax moth but the fumes are very nasty - not recommended for your attic:leaving:

Seal each super in a bin liner securely taped and stacked would be OK in the attic.
 

dickbowyer 

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Leave them in a deep freeze for a few days and then store stacked with paper between each super, sealed top and bottom.
 

oliver90owner 

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I would not leave supers where they could not be treated quickly and easily, if any wax moth were detected. I regularly burn sulphur strips in my stack of supers. Ethanoic acid is another alternative, as is spraying with Certan.

Deep freezing will kill any moth stages (I think), but unless sealed well, moth may get in. Hence me checking them (on an irregular basis). Last winter - just leaving them outside was likely good enough for most of the winter - from December onwards anyway!

PCB crystals (basically moth balls) was banned two or three years ago.

Two colonies, so not too many frames. I would be stacking them close to those colonies, possibly as another hive 'look-alike', but well sealed and dosed according to requirements. I use tie down straps to pull the supers together tightly (and it also helps when the stack topples over! BTDT).

Regards, RAB
 

Cazza 

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Perhaps I've just been lucky but for years I've stored mine in 6's with just a glass quilt top and bottom in a cold shed.
Never been bothered by wax moths.
Cazza
 

Dishmop 

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What about wax moth while the hive is actively er,,,, active?

i.e. suppose you saw one,, any threat and any treatment.
 

tonybloke 

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don't wax-moth larvae usuallyt attack brood frames, anyway? (protein in cell lining after pupation)
 

beebreeder 

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wrapped in industrial cling film, its a tedious job but they can be labelled as to what honey and hive they came from for next season, they can also be stored wet or dry and bees go straight into them in the spring.
 

MuswellMetro 

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Perhaps I've just been lucky but for years I've stored mine in 6's with just a glass quilt top and bottom in a cold shed.
Never been bothered by wax moths.
Cazza

i lasted years without WAX moths, then last winter lost all my stored super comb stored in garage

no hives near them

check the brood inspring ,nothing, strong hives


found the first wax moth caterpilar a month ago on a frame top

last inspection, moth caterpillars everywhere

11 crawling on the varroa board of one hive
 

drstitson 

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vac bags

why not get some of those bags designed for storing pillows, duvets etc, that you close up and then seal with a vacuum cleaner. should be a ble to get a few supers in the really big versions.
 

drstitson 

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wax moth query

btw what is the natural habitat of the wax moth in the absence of nice cosy apiaries packed with hives and accompanying sheds full of supers?
 

Cazza 

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i lasted years without WAX moths, then last winter lost all my stored super comb stored in garage

no hives near them

check the brood inspring ,nothing, strong hives


found the first wax moth caterpilar a month ago on a frame top

last inspection, moth caterpillars everywhere

11 crawling on the varroa board of one hive
Clearly I HAVE been lucky! I will take this on board and seal the supers this year.
Thanks MM
Cazza
 

Dishmop 

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why not get some of those bags designed for storing pillows, duvets etc, that you close up and then seal with a vacuum cleaner. should be a ble to get a few supers in the really big versions.
Is this method of storing frames legal for use on ASBO children?
 

Chris Luck 

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I simply stack mine upstairs in the grenier, (grain store?), with a sheet of 3mm plywood cut to size between each one....nothing can get in or out....

..... and horror of horrors I put them in store without letting the bees "dry" them, gives them a treat when they go back on in the spring and helps prevent the robbing urge in late season when they come of.

Chris
 

victor meldrew 

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btw what is the natural habitat of the wax moth in the absence of nice cosy apiaries packed with hives and accompanying sheds full of supers?
Wax moths remove (eat) all traces of bumble bee nests
Nature wastes nowt !!

John Wilkinson
 

The Riviera Kid 

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thanks for the suggestions.

I went through both supers awaiting storage an couldn't see anything in terms of moths nor larvae. however I am relatively new as a bee keeper so I may have missed something.

I like the idea of the vacuum seal bags. Nothing, not even wax moth larvae, can live without air - can it???

I got given some old frames and supers a year ago for firewood and I left them stacked in my dad's garage for a few weeks to dry out and they got hopelessly infested with moths - so I don't want to risk that with my own bees.
 

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