Smoker fuel?

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What have people tried using for smoker fuel?

Last year i started by using the sacks from Thornes then went on to sawdust(I have a cedar+oak mill next to my apiary that cuts trees) then tried pine needles.

I was thinking about people using sawdust from timber that has not been treated with chemicals,what about Hampster bedding? would that not be untreated?
 

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then tried pine needles.
I use soft rotten birch and birch polyphora. They do not generate tar.
You have not birch (?) but you have much other soft rotten deciduous trees.
Good rotten tree smolders by its own.

Many make good smoke but it generates tar. First tar glues the smoker shut when it gets cold.
Tar attaches onto comb wax and makes smoke aroma into honey. You find it when you taste uncapping honey.


 
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Polyanwood 

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Didn't think about burning fungus. There is a black polypore that grows on the ground in the woods called king alfred's cakes which people used to gather to light fires with. Not sure it makes good smoke though. Yes there are birch trees. Hadn't thought about the idea of tar either very interesting. Unfortunately am still at the back of the class trying to keep the smoker alight so will have to get better at that as first priority:eek:.
 

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pine cones and cardboard seem to do the trick for me - although, its a battered smoker, and the holes dont line up that well, but persistance pays off!
 

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Oh, Id never thought of tar - we dont have many birch trees round our way, could you perhaps suggest other low-tar alternatives please?
 

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could you perhaps suggest other low-tar alternatives please?
Try to get as soft rotten wood like toalet paper. Dry it up and try how it smolders. Strong odor is not good because honey takes aroma from it.
Rotten tree stumps are good too.
 
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Widdershins 

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Right! Will keep an eye open when out with the dog! thanks
 

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Yes Finman we do have birch,also ash is very good and burns without tar.
 

Widdershins 

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We tend to have a lot of fruit trees near us more than anything else...
 

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I use old sacks and rotten wood when I've got some dry - I have plenty of rotten wood, but not much of it is dry enough to light.

Widdershins - look in the hedge bottoms when you are out walking, if any trees have been cut there's often a stump left.
 

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That would explain why the guy who supplies my local Thornes has Honey that tastes like its been in a fire then.
 

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One thing more...
I have forget many times lighter home and I have taken fire to rotten tree from car lighter.
 
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I dont have that problem as I always have a lighter with me :sifone:

I new I would find a use for that damn smilie..
 

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I tried bee tobacco...I liked the smell, but somone told me that it was bad for the bees!
:sifone::sifone:
 

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Like pub honey. I think the bee tobacco was harmful to the queens.
 

Dave 

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Hi

I used sacking, untill I used the sacks and filled them with fir cones, seem to go well, and cool smoke, but sometimes need something in the bottom to keep/get them going, or a small blow torch!

Cheers

Dave
 

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I was thinking about people using sawdust from timber that has not been treated with chemicals,what about Hampster bedding? would that not be untreated?
Yuck. I can smell the ammonia now.
 

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