Selling honey at the gate: is weight info on the label mandatory?

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Curly green finger's 

Apiculturist to the bones!
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Jarred. Though it not crucial as long as it refers to a"batch" The batch number or date is important for traceability as it allows a batch to be identified if a problem was identified after it has been sold to a consumer.
Good idea to have tamper labels on your jars imo, who's to know if it gets contaminated after you have sold it.
Im sure this is rear indeed.
 

lindsay s 

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Register your food business with your local council they are only there to help you. I had to send my label via email to be approved because of covid restrictions. The lady told me I didn’t need a batch number if I put the date it was processed
For more than 30 years I’ve been selling my correctly labelled honey to a local shop and have received a good price for it. The amount varies between a few dozen and and a couple of hundred jars depending on my harvest. I also sell direct and I give a lot away.

With the increase in beekeepers here and a good season more local honey has been appearing in our shops. Unfortunately the labelling on some the jars fell foul of the regulations and someone with a bee in their bonnet brought it to the attention of our local trading standards.

This week environmental health have been in touch with our beekeeping secretary and have asked her to inform our members of the new label regulations that come into force on the 1/10/21 in Scotland. I’m fine with that but they also said that “there is a requirement for all producers of food for human consumption to register with the competent food Authority” that means our environmental health department.

I’m not sure if they just want to know that we exist or if at the other extreme we end up with inspections and having to complete hygiene courses ( I know a local cake maker who works from home and she had to jump through all the hoops! ) I’ve been lucky and have managed to stay under the council radar until now.

I have always followed the the guidelines in my booklet from the Scottish Beekeepers that deals with the processing of honey at home. Also I’ve never had any complaints about my honey and any modest profit is usually ploughed back into my hobby. Registering with the council is giving me food for thought even though this year’s harvest is nearly bottled.

I’m sure some of the the larger honey producers will be thinking it’s about time the hobby beekeepers were brought into line. But like me how many don’t even know that they have to be registered and depending how strict environmental health are, is it worth the hassle for a small amount of honey. This is Scotland I am referring too, I don’t know about the rest of the UK. Any thoughts?
 
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lindsay s 

Grumble Bee
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[
For more than 30 years I’ve been selling my correctly labelled honey to a local shop and have received a good price for it. The amount varies between a few dozen and and a couple of hundred jars depending on my harvest. I also sell direct and I give a lot away.

With the increase in beekeepers here and a good season more local honey has been appearing in our shops. Unfortunately the labelling on some the jars fell foul of the regulations and someone with a bee in their bonnet brought it to the attention of our local trading standards.

This week environmental health have been in touch with our beekeeping secretary and have asked her to inform our members of the new label regulations that come into force on the 1/10/21 in Scotland. I’m fine with that but they also said that “there is a requirement for all producers of food for human consumption to register with the competent food Authority” that means our environmental health department.

I’m not sure if they just want to know that we exist or if at the other extreme we end up with inspections and having to complete hygiene courses ( I know a local cake maker who works from home and she had to jump through all the hoops! ) I’ve been lucky and have managed to stay under the council radar until now.

I have always followed the the guidelines in my booklet from the Scottish Beekeepers that deals with the processing of honey at home. Also I’ve never had any complaints about my honey and any modest profit is usually ploughed back into my hobby. Registering with the council is giving me food for thought even though this year’s harvest is nearly bottled.

I’m sure some of the the larger honey producers will be thinking it’s about time the hobby beekeepers were brought into line. But like me how many don’t even know that they have to be registered and depending how strict environmental health are, is it worth the hassle for a small amount of honey. This is Scotland I am referring too, I don’t know about the rest of the UK. Any thoughts?
Well I jumped the gun and got my self into a panic about our environmental health department. They have since updated our association secretary and have offered to provide an advice sheet for beekeepers and to participate in a meeting. They also said
“Please assure your members that our involvement will be light touch and wish to be a source of advice and guidance not bureaucracy and paperwork.”
I will sleep a bit easier now.
 

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