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replacing wax in frames?

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warts 

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Hi All
I am trying to get ahead for next year, and am looking at replacing some of the wax in the super frames. Is this as straightforward as I think it will be or is there any top tips you know about that might help prevent expletives if it all starts to go horribly wrong.

Much appreciated in advance

Sally
 

Black Comb 

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Why replace super foundation?

If it's drawn and extracted then cleaned out by the bees it can be re-used for years. You can store it over the winter after treating with acetic acid to kill the nasties. Drawn foundation in the supers means the bees can start storing the honey quicker.

Brood foundation is a different story.
 

warts 

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Hi PeterS
I happen to have damaged the wax in some of the frames (it got scrunched up in the boot of the car after a sharp braking episode). Some were only slightly damaged, and I pushed some of the wax back into shape and the bees (when I returned the frames to them) did the rest, i.e. almost as good as new. Some however are a little beyond this remedy
 

MJBee 

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Pretty straight forward - Lever the wedge away from the top bar and tap one bottom bar away from the sides. Cut out the old wax, throughly scrape all the bits especially the grooves in the side bars. Fit new foundation and Robert is your mother's brother.

If the frames were not from your hives I would advise a boil in washing soda, but as they are it is not necessary.
 

Black Comb 

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As my mother used to say "never assume"

Time for some self flagellation.
:redface:
 

oliver90owner 

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Don't do it.

Remove and clean up frames - yes.

Only replace foundation when required, or a short time before.

It is better to replace all of the wax in a frame at once - part frames are more trouble than worth, especially with wire reinforcing.

Unless seriously damaged, you might scrape back to the foundation (mid-rib)and let them draw them again (never tried this as mine all go into the Burco and are melted out and re-done, when tatty).

Be sure the groove is completely clear of wax, and cut the corners off the foundation to make it easier to fit.

You should be replacing wax in some of the brood frames. They are much more difficult than a super frame, so if you can do them shallows should be a 'walk in the park'.

Oh, and finally, at fifty pence a frame is it worth it?

Regards, RAB
 
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leftofcentre2010 

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Why replace super foundation?

If it's drawn and extracted then cleaned out by the bees it can be re-used for years. You can store it over the winter after treating with acetic acid to kill the nasties.
Wont the stink of vinegar upset the bees when re-introduced?

Acetic acid in concentrated form is pretty strong corrosive stuff! i used to drive Tankers of the stuff years ago!!

Andy
 

oliver90owner 

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Yep, still the same stuff. Still melts at 16.2 degrees Celsius when pure but we use about 80%. It is volatile or you wouldn't have smelled it, but yes it needs 'airing' before replacing in the hive. Good against waxmoth and nosema spores. Only one real difference - it is now called ethanoic acid.

Regards, RAB
 

Finman 

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Damaged comb or foundation?

It is better wait for summer. Then straighten the comb when it is about 30C warm.
Cut something off if you can not straigten the comg.

If there is a hole. Glue with hot wax a repair piece into the hole.

Bees repair the rest.
 

MuswellMetro 

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i normally replace a 1/5th of my honey comb every year, by completely replacing all frames with new frames and foundation in 1 in five of my supers

why, well i have tried boiling or dishwasher with soda and repaired frames but had old frames fail in the extractor with damaged top bars, fractured nails and loose wires etc,

this year i have a dilemma as to whether to replace any as in 2009/10 winter i lost all the comb to wax moth and i therefore have all new year wax
 

jimbeekeeper 

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Don't do it.



Oh, and finally, at fifty pence a frame is it worth it?
RAB
No!

Cut out wax, and save for trade in etc. Use frame for fire kindling...they get a fire going great.

As said above, foundation should be clean is stored correctly etc, and minor problems they will sort out.

No point getting them to waste energy drawing out foundation.
 

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