Quantcast

Reducing draft in winter

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,516
Reaction score
21
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
I was told that normally i should put an empty super below the OM Floor to reduce drafts.

well quite a new Beek, and looking at the girls in the snow,see pic, i realise that i have put the super between the OMF and the brood

so my hive is feeding super with insulation and biult in crown board, standard brood, extending 14X12 Eke, empty super, OMF

will it matter? do i just leave it, or do i heft the whole hive and swop the OMF and empty super the other way round
 
T

Tom Bick 

Guest
As I see it it might be ok left now but will need to be switched very early spring as you may start to get comb built on the bottom of the frames as the cluster and the bees become active.
Perhaps if we get a better week it might be better to do it now you can also just adapt your stand to form a bit of a wind break as apposed to a super on the bottom of the hive.
I think you are right to think of the wind as your hive is close to other objects they can act as a wind breaks or trap the wind forcing it up which may cause more draft up into the hive.
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,628
Reaction score
26
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
At this time of year? Leave things alone. They may start building comb where you don't want it early in the spring - unless you can get it changed round at an early opportunity.

I think I was only on standard broods when I did that - and regretted it.

Regards, RAB
 

peteinwilts 

Drone Bee
Joined
May 12, 2009
Messages
1,755
Reaction score
2
Location
North Wilts
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Lots and lots
I am also a newbie, and may be doing it wrong. I have a weak colony that I am trying to get through Winter and I also thought an empty super would act us a cushion between the colony and cold weather.

Also, having converted one of my colonys earlier in the year from a standrad national to 14x12's I am also quite aware of the issue of unwanted comb hanging below the frames. (although I now see you can buy conversion kits!)

Not sure if it is going to work, but I placed a slighly offset OMF directly under the brood, so there is a gap below the bee space of the brood box, so they can get in and out which will hopefully prevent large amounts of hanging comb. Below this I placed a super (the old national brood box actually!) and then another mesh floor and regular door below this.

I'll let you know if it worked in the spring!!
 

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,516
Reaction score
21
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
Did the Oxalic and re arranged hive

As we had a relative mild day (6c )after what is to london several days of hard frost, i took the oportunity to open the hive and used oxalic on the bees (They were still with brood in mid december)

also rearranged the hive with the super below the OMF and gave them a candy bar for christmas, the bees were in a very tight cluster on three frames near the rear of the hive ( not warmway frames) with a couple of dead bees on the OMF when i quickly moved the lower super below the floor
 
Last edited:

jezd 

Drone Bee
Joined
May 12, 2009
Messages
1,541
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
Hive Type
other
Number of Hives
299.1
as general point I am not sure how you can possibly be worried about drafts in that location, your in the city, behind a fence, surrounded by garden stuff - I think the last thing those bees will suffer is drafts.
 

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,516
Reaction score
21
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
as general point I am not sure how you can possibly be worried about drafts in that location, your in the city, behind a fence, surrounded by garden stuff - I think the last thing those bees will suffer is drafts.

well, its muswell hill, 300ft high point in an general area called northern heights in london ( hampsted,highgate and Alexandra Palace Park). with my garden facing south west over looking the london basin and 150 acre open parkland/golf course/allotment.

in the 20 years i have lived there because my house is on the highest point it is quite a wind tunnel..damage so far 1986 chinmey down through sitting room, flat roof lifted by suction..and at other storms since, greenhouse wrecked, fences down three times ( once every fence damaged),an appletree blown down, side of house stained glass window blown in and many time tiles ripped from edge of roof ( enough to had had a new roof fitted last year)

....so i am cautious, especially as the november storm moved a super of the brood box by 1" ( hence the heavier slopping roof)


my allotments over the garden fence
 
Last edited:

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,628
Reaction score
26
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
6' x 6' solid panel fence. Continually damaged by wind? Try a lower fence (solid) with a trellis, or similar, at the top couple of foot, if you must have it that high. Likely the end of damaged fencing, or at least a reduction in same.

You obviously need better security for flat roofs! Or a sturdy arrangement to create turbulance rather than lift, to reduce the risks in high winds.

Shutters on windows on the 'danger' elevation is also a good idea to consider.

Regards, RAB
 

Hebeegeebee 

Drone Bee
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
1,966
Reaction score
11
Location
S.E. Norfolk
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
12 on a good day, often more..
If you are in a windy location, then a hive strap would be adviseable to hold everything together. As for checking brood status in December - why? It's usually best to leave well alone apart from oxalic treatment until the Spring.
 

jezd 

Drone Bee
Joined
May 12, 2009
Messages
1,541
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
Hive Type
other
Number of Hives
299.1
If you are in a windy location, then a hive strap would be adviseable to hold everything together. As for checking brood status in December - why? It's usually best to leave well alone apart from oxalic treatment until the Spring.
all my nationals have a big lump of yorkshire stone dumped on the roof!

:)
 

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,516
Reaction score
21
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
If you are in a windy location, then a hive strap would be adviseable to hold everything together. As for checking brood status in December - why? It's usually best to leave well alone apart from oxalic treatment until the Spring.
i did not check brood,I just moved the windbreak super as i had just done OX and had already disturbed the bees, quick job as it was in the wrong place above the floor

so ...varroa board in, hive tool in below 14x12 Eke to crack propolis, lift, slide out super, hive down onto floor/varroa board, hefted whole hive and floor (still B***Y heavy), slide in super under floor/varroa board...30 sec if that, temperature +6c, and +1c over night...removed varroa board after two days of mite watching..55...15 drop

Wind...fence is high to keep the neighbour happy with bees , ...strap on order
 

admin 

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2008
Messages
6,393
Reaction score
1
Location
Hampshire uk
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
6
I am to embarrassed to show pictures of the blocks of concrete I have on my hives this winter,I had 2 hives go over in strong winds during December so took action.

They should be in Australia by March with the weight on the roofs.
 
Top