Queen Introduction - Why wait?

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Mabee

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I have introduced a few new queens to my apiary this year using the push-in cage method, which I find works really well.

The last introduction, due to other commitments meant I had to remove the old Q and introduce the new queen immediately (I had read Michael Palmer does this), I couldn't check on them for 5 days after, which was probably a good thing, but when I did check, she was out the cage and laying away. There were 4 queen cells which I removed but they haven't made any since. So, I will be trying this again in a few weeks as I realise one time is not a real experiment, probably not two either, but just wondering who else has tried this successfully?
 

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Op is not clear, did they "run" the new Q in immediately or put it under a cage?
 

Mabee

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Op is not clear, did they "run" the new Q in immediately or put it under a cage?
"but when I did check, she was out the cage and laying away."

She was under push in cage
 

Michael Palmer

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When requeening a colony using either a push in or wooden cage, the bees will often make emergency cells. Once the queen is released the cells are usually destroyed by the colony.
 

magor

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When requeening a colony using either a push in or wooden cage, the bees will often make emergency cells. Once the queen is released the cells are usually destroyed by the colony.
hi , may i ask

if you have noticed any relationship between those emergency cells and supercedure cells after ? i kinda mean the more emergency they draw the less the chance supercedure cells apear after......
 

Mabee

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When requeening a colony using either a push in or wooden cage, the bees will often make emergency cells. Once the queen is released the cells are usually destroyed by the colony.
I was looking for information on introducing queens immediately after removing the old queen since i found myself in that situation and had seen your post on another forum saying you did this, I wasn’t sure if you used a push in cage or small queen cage when you did it. Anyway it worked and was much easier and faster than other methods.
 

Michael Palmer

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hi , may i ask

if you have noticed any relationship between those emergency cells and supercedure cells after ? i kinda mean the more emergency they draw the less the chance supercedure cells apear after......
Haven't seen anything relationship. Supercedure would indicate that the bees found my new queen unacceptable. I would expect if so, the supercedure cells would show up weeks or more from introduction.
 
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After loosing a queen on introduction with a yellow cage last year, this year I've used a push in cage for 2 days and queens accepted and laying. But I made the 5 frame nucs hopelessly queenless. Belt and braces? Unnecessary?
These are queens that have only been laying for a week (edit: maybe 10 days so you can check capped brood) in mating nucs. Should queen have been laying for longer before introduction?
. . . . Ben
 

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