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Queen introduction under Thymol

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Leigh 

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Has anyone had issues (over and above the normal regicide which seems to have been one of the quirks of this season) with introducing a queen whilst the colony is being treated with Thymol (slow release from oasis)?

Just one of those thoughts that ran through my head as I popped a caged queen into a very queenless colony this morning - wondered if thymol fumes made success less likely.

....I guess it is a difficult thing to prove, and so an utterly pointless question!

Still, opinions would be interesting.
 

MJBee 

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As you say difficult to prove but as scent plays a big part in acceptance perhaps the reek of thymol may actually help:coolgleamA:

On the downside the bees may be a bit more up tight with a hive full of fumes:leaving:
 

Poly Hive 

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I would not have done it. Colonies under stress are not in the best of humours and you really want to load the odds in your favour.

PH
 

Hivemaker. 

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If they were queenless and broodless...i would treat them for 48 hours or so for varroa, and remove the treatment before introduction,or wait until the new queen was well accepted and then treat.
 

Eyeman 

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Just one of those thoughts that ran through my head as I popped a caged queen into a very queenless colony this morning
There are a number of other treatment options for broodless colonies- sugar dusting, oxalic acid, lactic acid. These are one off treatments for varroa.
Normally a colony remains in the hive because of the queen and or brood- putting thymol into a queenless/ broodless colony has a risk of them absconding.
Let us know how you get on.
 

beebreeder 

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I made up my last two nucs of the season a couple of weeks ago, broke down a double brood and used a queen from a mini nuc, it was pxxxxng down with rain, the bees in both nuc boxes were q/less for two days, so knocked down all cells and as it was all I had in the truck i misted each frame with light thymolised syrup, queen in slow release cage and then misted the bees in the mini with the same spray and shook them into the box and left them to it. Checked at the w/end and have two laying queens,I also fed them with thymolised syrup. Probably just luck but I did'nt want to overwinter too many mini nucs and don't like wintering double brood, killed two birds with one stone. I await the replies of horror.
 
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Polyanwood 

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I sometimes do the same thing using talcum powder... so am not shocked, but I only do it if I am not too worried about it going wrong. I think it is more risky. I wouldn't do it with a queen I'd paid good money for.
 

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