Queen cell introduction?

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Hawklord 

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When is it best to put a capped queen cell into a nuc? Should I wait until the 8th day after I split the colony and at that time remove any queen cells that the nuc has made for itself?
 

ian 

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Hi Hawklord

Firstly the nuc should obviously be q-less and making it's own cells.

And secondly it's not so much as the best time for the nuc but rather best time for the cells, if you are moving cells around they should only be a couple of days from hatching so there is less chance of damage to the queen inside.

Any transfered cell can also have the added protection of a piece of tape around the main body, keep the tip exposed!!! bees will not rip down Q-cells from the top always the side.

So as long as the nuc has started with their own cells and the cells you are transfering are a day or 2 off hatching that is the ideal.


Regards Ian
 

ainsie 

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Hi Ian, am I right in thinking that the newly emerged virgin queen will destroy any queens in the emergency cells that the queenless nuke may have produced? Ainsie
 

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If you take nuc bees from same hive which reared the cell, you need not to worry about it. You may strengten the nuc from emerging brood farmes from other hive. First shake all bees off.
 

Hawklord 

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If you take nuc bees from same hive which reared the cell, you need not to worry about it. You may strengten the nuc from emerging brood farmes from other hive. First shake all bees off.
The queen cells will be coming from another colony as they seem a lot quieter than the ones I currently have.
 

ian 

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Hi Ainsie

Sometimes but I would not depeend on it, if the nuc is large enough it's likely/possible they could through a cast.(or they just feel like it):svengo:

So you can squish the q-cells and ensure any larvae are past viable age.


Regards Ian
 

Hawklord 

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Hi Hawklord

Any transfered cell can also have the added protection of a piece of tape around the main body, keep the tip exposed!!! bees will not rip down Q-cells from the top always the side.


Regards Ian
What sort of tape - the sticky plastic stuff or will masking tape be ok?
 

Poly Hive 

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tape or coiled cell protectors though to be honest I never suffered from cells being torn down.

The golden rule for cells virgins and or queens is to offer the colony what they are expecting.

And if they are not expecting what you intend to do then either you have to run the far more serious risk of rejection, or you fool them.

PH
 

ainsie 

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Hi Ian, is it best to make nukes up several days before you introduce q/cells so making sure there ara no viable larvae?sorry for all the questions just trying to learn for next year.ainsie
 

admin 

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I like to use the hair roller cage from the Cupkit leaving the end open for the queen to emerge from.
It maybe overkill but it works for me.
 

ian 

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Hi Ainsie

Yes it's best to make the nuc's up in advance, as Poly H said it's best to give the bees what they are expecting.

Cell protectors are not a must have item, but many Jentner type kits have them and you can normaly acquire them along the way. One things for sure you will not lose any queens by using them, and if you have gone to all the trouble of getting/grafting decent cells why not look after them.

Protectors really come into their own when you have had to take short cuts(time frame) with the making up of nucs.

So pays your money takes your choice.


Regards Ian
 
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Ontario Beekeeper 

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Something over looked;

Make sure the Nuc that is getting the Queen cell is well fed. It has been shown, that if the bees feel like they are in a dearth condition they will tear queen cells down.
 

Poly Hive 

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Not so much over looked but assumed. I would not consider making up a nuc that is NOT being fed. flow or no flow, I give them a slurp of syrup.

A good heads up though, and a reminder not to assume.

PH
 

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Actually I'm not assuming. Plenty of beginner beekeepers are not aware of just how important sufficient feed is during all steps of Queen rearing.
 

Poly Hive 

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My point. Feeding is critical for nucs and of course for Queenrearing but it tends not to be mentioned. And it is not mentioned as it is assumed.

PH
 
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