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Finman 

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What the video tells, it is statistics , not genetics. It tells about variation.

The most usual statistical method is percent calculation. To clear out variation there are several methods
 

Apple 

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:iagree:
Variability in traits is inherited, the more individuals displaying that trait is down to genetics, statistically.

You do not need a doctorate from Harvard to understand that!
 

Apple 

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You could always frame it and hang it next to your BBKA basics exam certificate!:icon_204-2:
 

elainemary 

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I've found this very interesting as some of you will.

Please comment on this video as some of it has gone over my head!
Good explanation and helps with studying for Module 7! My take out is this. Do everything you can to provide a good environment (dry hive, solid ground, winter sun, good forage). Rest down to the traits of your bees that are inherited. Difficulty with breeding bees is being able to influence one half of the inherited genes from drones. Best you can do is keep selecting queens from your best strains and choose strains that are consistent in their traits.
 
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Good explanation and helps with studying for Module 7! My take out is this. Do everything you can to provide a good environment (dry hive, solid ground, winter sun, good forage). Rest down to the traits of your bees that are inherited. Difficulty with breeding bees is being able to influence one half of the inherited genes from drones. Best you can do is keep selecting queens from your best strains and choose strains that are consistent in their traits.
Thanks.. I'm trying to do all the above, selecting my queen's and colonys for the traits I desire.

I would like to keep the genetics of my Italian locals but as the generations go by I'm losing them, which is a shame, because they are so productive in early spring and the queen's are so prolific.
In comparison to my black queen's.

I don't have time to do any modules so all of my knowledge is coming from a mentor, books and practical experiences..

I would love to concentrate on some proper study maybe one day, thanks elainemary.
 

elainemary 

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Thanks.. I'm trying to do all the above, selecting my queen's and colonys for the traits I desire.

I would like to keep the genetics of my Italian locals but as the generations go by I'm losing them, which is a shame, because they are so productive in early spring and the queen's are so prolific.
In comparison to my black queen's.

I don't have time to do any modules so all of my knowledge is coming from a mentor, books and practical experiences..

I would love to concentrate on some proper study maybe one day, thanks elainemary.
Hi think that’s because you have 2 very different strains so they are crossing and dominant genes are winning - maybe these are better adapted to your area?
My view is it’s best to keep one strain and keep selecting from that. It’s difficult unless you live in an isolated area or have good persuasive powers and can influence all beekeepers in your immediate area to do the same thing! But selecting from your best and keeping to a strain without too much variation, is better than doing nothing & you can make easy progress on temper & reasonable (rather than huge) productivity 🐝
 

elainemary 

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Thanks.. I'm trying to do all the above, selecting my queen's and colonys for the traits I desire.

I would like to keep the genetics of my Italian locals but as the generations go by I'm losing them, which is a shame, because they are so productive in early spring and the queen's are so prolific.
In comparison to my black queen's.

I don't have time to do any modules so all of my knowledge is coming from a mentor, books and practical experiences..

I would love to concentrate on some proper study maybe one day, thanks elainemary.
P.s. like you I read lots, have a good mentor & fortunate after having a hectic career, now have time to study. Strong believer in hands on experience, learning from mistakes, as well as studying to learn.
 

Erichalfbee 

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I fell at the first hurdle

Got an unclassified in the pomposity module
The bog standard stuff is good. You need to be able to handle the bees without dropping frames, without killing and squashing bees and being able to ascertain whether you are queen right and what a queen cell looks like etc etc etc all of which are gleaned in the year that you need to keep bees before you take the assessment.

It's this bit I'm uncomfortable with
Oral questioning and Assessment of the Candidate’s knowledge of Natural History and Beekeeping.
Oral questioning on Swarming, Swarm Control and effects.
Oral questioning on Diseases and Pests


I would end up arguing with the assessor.........
I'm not one for learning and committing to memory things I disagree with just to get a ticket though I would if I needed one to keep bees on an allotment for example

I do like to learn new things
I do have a grasp of basic genetics and enjoyed Curley Green Fingers recent link but again I don't like to be pressured into yet another qualification......I had enough of that with CPD during my career.
Don't get me wrong....I take my hat off to those who can take the pressure, who quietly go about their learning for the joy of it.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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I'm not one for learning and committing to memory things I disagree with just to get a ticket .................. but again I don't like to be pressured into yet another qualification......I had enough of that with CPD during my career.
Don't get me wrong....I take my hat off to those who can take the pressure, who quietly go about their learning for the joy of it.
:iagree: got a file a few inches thick full of my tickets, still get sent off to do the odd one now, I suppose my IOSH one is at least useful for personal stuff - been useful the last few weeks anyway and tucked away in there was one from 1996 at the Armed Forces driving academy which really impressed my boss when flourished during an argument with one of our knowitall PITA's on the South coast.
 

Mellifera Crofter 

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The bog standard stuff is good. ...

It's this bit I'm uncomfortable with
Oral questioning and Assessment of the Candidate’s knowledge of Natural History and Beekeeping.
Oral questioning on Swarming, Swarm Control and effects.
Oral questioning on Diseases and Pests


I would end up arguing with the assessor.........
...
I do like to learn new things
...
Maybe the assessor would want you to argue your point of view. Assessors, from my experience, aren't thick and one-track-minded. You can learn about things you don't agree with, and then argue why you don't agree. That's a perfectly good way to learn, and to being assessed.

Working your way through the modules is about learning new things. For me, it was a quick and satisfying way to learn new things - and not just about the bog standard stuff. Other people might prefer a different route.
 

Erichalfbee 

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Maybe the assessor would want you to argue your point of view. Assessors, from my experience, aren't thick and one-track-minded. You can learn about things you don't agree with, and then argue why you don't agree. That's a perfectly good way to learn, and to being assessed.
Maybe Kitta.
A have spoken to a few people who were not given the opportunity when they did raise objections but then I haven’t done a widespread survey so you might be right.
You pays your money and you takes your chances I guess.
 

elainemary 

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This provides a simple thoughtful read, its about considering characteristics before ancestry when breeding.
Thanks for sharing this, totally agree with your philosophies. Last 2 seasons I’ve started to group my colonies into As and Bs, rearing queens from As, maintaining Bs to give them another chance to assess, but not specifically expanding from them. I’ve realised I need a C group for those with 2 years of assessment that I should requeen.
I live 1000ft in the Pennines, your criteria for productivity matches well with mine. Not got into Wing morphology (yet!) but my best colonies are all dark queens which are frugal on winter stores and gentle but good on the heather!
Ive just finished reading Donald Simms book 60 years with bees, was from your part of the country.
Would be interested to know if there is any connection between your bees and his (wondering if his lineage is still around?)
Elaine
 
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Hi think that’s because you have 2 very different strains so they are crossing and dominant genes are winning - maybe these are better adapted to your area?
My view is it’s best to keep one strain and keep selecting from that. It’s difficult unless you live in an isolated area or have good persuasive powers and can influence all beekeepers in your immediate area to do the same thing! But selecting from your best and keeping to a strain without too much variation, is better than doing nothing & you can make easy progress on temper & reasonable (rather than huge) productivity 🐝
This provides a simple thoughtful read, its about considering characteristics before ancestry when breeding.
Thanks murrox for sharing this link.
In some ways I'm following much the same principles when selecting my breeder queen's and the simpler you make it the easier it becomes and understandable so for this I'm going to say K. I. S. S.
 

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