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LeaBees 

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Hi all,
At the risk of rehashing what might already have been gone over, and apologies if this is the case, but I still cant figure out if it is advisable to paint the inside of poly feeders (nus or otherwise), and should it be done with something specific? Or can the exterior masonary paint still be used ?

I expect painting the connecting "bits" and the inside of the hives is unnecessary?

Thank you all!
 

Ian123 

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Hi I’ve never painted internal poly inc feeders and not meeting areas.
 

Boston Bees 

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Yes, the recommendation is that you should paint the inside of poly feeders - anywhere that the syrup will touch, effectively. Masonry paint is perfect. Otherwise the syrup will seep into the poly. That might not do any harm, but then again it might - I have seen a video of an unpainted Paynes nuc with extensive mould on the outer face caused by syrup leaking through the integral feeder, for example, so clearly it can be an issue.

But yes, in general you don't need to paint inside poly hives, with that exception.
 

Swarm 

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I don't think it's necessary, I've got some painted with gloss and others not painted and no difference really.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Yes, the recommendation is that you should paint the inside of poly feeders - anywhere that the syrup will touch, effectively. Masonry paint is perfect. Otherwise the syrup will seep into the poly.
Never seen that happen - never painted the inside of my feeders and haven't seen any mould either
 

Gilberdyke John 

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Hi all,
At the risk of rehashing what might already have been gone over, and apologies if this is the case, but I still cant figure out if it is advisable to paint the inside of poly feeders (nus or otherwise), and should it be done with something specific? Or can the exterior masonary paint still be used ?

I expect painting the connecting "bits" and the inside of the hives is unnecessary?

Thank you all!
Depends on the density/quality of the poly
 

local_beekeeper 

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Poly feeders should be painted inside with food-safe paint.
 

pargyle 

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Hi all,
At the risk of rehashing what might already have been gone over, and apologies if this is the case, but I still cant figure out if it is advisable to paint the inside of poly feeders (nus or otherwise), and should it be done with something specific? Or can the exterior masonary paint still be used ?

I expect painting the connecting "bits" and the inside of the hives is unnecessary?

Thank you all!
Not the feeders or the closing edges but I coat (I'll not say paint) the insides of new poly hives with propolis varnish that I make myself by dissolving propolis from frame scrapings in methylated spirits. The bees will propolise all the interior surfaces and I reckon this gives them a head start .. it smells really bee-ish, the meths base evaporates very quickly and leaves nothing behind but the propolis varnish. Works really well in bait hives as well.
 

Angry_Mob 

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The Paynes nucs in particular (bad batch?) had a problem not so long ago in the unpainted nucs; syrup would seep through the material and attracted wasps which then chewed the poly on the outside of the nuc.

The Paynes and Maisimore nucs are 100g/ltr. The BS nuc is 120g/ltr. Another advantage of this it the BS nuc is easier to paint as the surface is less porous.



I used to use white bathroom anti mould paint. It did look nice with the bright white feeder interior but now just paint them the same colour as the exterior. I use a solvent based paint which seems to give a durable finish.
 

ericbeaumont 

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not all poly is the same density/quality, and that might account for the variations in results and experiences.
Yes, poly will mould when water or sugar is about, but I don't think mould cares about poly density. I've experienced Park (soft), Paynes (average), Maisemore and BS (hardest) and they all gain mould in-between poly particles if unpainted.

Wasps have been known to smell syrup as it seeps through unpainted poly and it's not much work to give feeders two coats. I use whatever is at hand, gloss more than masonry, though some need to be aired for a while afterwards to give VOCs time to fade. Solvent paints are tougher and seal well.

Years ago I bought a couple of new Thorne Ashforth cedar feeders and was so struck by the VOCs coming off the gloss paint on the inside that I rang Thorne; they assured me (rather too breezily) that it was not an issue and that no-one had mentioned it before. Smell was so strong that I didn't use them to feed bees for about a year.

Having said that, worth asking: is mould a big deal? Hives are loaded with fungi that live symbiotically with bees, so not a major worry. Difference with a feeder is that mould may cause fermentation, so in the end, I reckon it's worth the effort to paint.
 
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Antipodes 

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Yes, poly will mould when water or sugar is about, but I don't think mould cares about poly density. I've experienced Park (soft), Paynes (average), Maisemore and BS (hardest) and they all gain mould in-between poly particles if unpainted.

Wasps have been known to smell syrup as it seeps through unpainted poly and it's not much work to give feeders two coats. I use whatever is at hand, gloss more than masonry, though some need to be aired for a while afterwards to give VOCs time to fade. Solvent paints are tougher and seal well.

Years ago I bought a couple of new Thorne Ashforth cedar feeders and was so struck by the VOCs coming off the gloss paint on the inside that I rang Thorne; they assured me (rather too breezily) that it was not an issue and that no-one had mentioned it before. Smell was so strong that I didn't use them to feed bees for about a year.

Having said that, worth asking: is mould a big deal? Hives are loaded with fungi that live symbiotically with bees, so not a major worry; difference with a feeder is that mould may cause fermentation, so in the end, I reckon it's worth the effort to paint.
Yes, I think it is about the penetration of the liquid perhaps more than the mould.
I have some "high density" poly mini hives that need to be painted on the inside to stop the bees chewing it away and on the outside of course to stop the UV light breaking them down.
 
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BoStor 

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The Paynes nucs in particular (bad batch?) had a problem not so long ago in the unpainted nucs; syrup would seep through the material and attracted wasps which then chewed the poly on the outside of the nuc.

The Paynes and Maisimore nucs are 100g/ltr. The BS nuc is 120g/ltr. Another advantage of this it the BS nuc is easier to paint as the surface is less porous.



I used to use white bathroom anti mould paint. It did look nice with the bright white feeder interior but now just paint them the same colour as the exterior. I use a solvent based paint which seems to give a durable finish.
Excuse this question but am new here. There are some "advisers" who insist that paint for polly hives should be masonry paint, is that incorrect in your experience?
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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some "advisers" who insist that paint for polly hives should be masonry paint, is that incorrect
Sort of - it does not have to be masonry paint, any paint will do, some use things like Cuprinol shades, some commercial outfits use gloss paint, some emulsion. So to insist that it must be masonry paint is nowhere near correct.
 

hemo 

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Masonry paint has a tendency to peel off more.
I use Cuprinol shades or a Ronseal similar type garden paint.
 
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