One example of how long it can take to get a laying queen.

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Sutty

From Glossop, North Derbyshire, UK
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15th May: multiple QCs, some sealed, nuced the queen and left 1QC.
21st May: emerged QC seen (should have looked earlier) EQCs being taken down by the bees, all EQCs destroyed. Assume a virgin present.
16th June: no eggs, no brood, grumpy. Given a test frame.
23rd June: no EQCs on test frame but nice fat queen seen. I didn't examine the last few frames in the bottom box after I saw & marked her but no brood up to that point.
They've been a bit defensive, I hope they settle down now!
So 5½ weeks from nucing the queen to seeing a (presumably) laying queen.
 
Same timing here, starting the same day. Mine started laying on June 18th or 19th. The weather kept them inside for quite a few days.
 
15th May: multiple QCs, some sealed, nuced the queen and left 1QC.
21st May: emerged QC seen (should have looked earlier) EQCs being taken down by the bees, all EQCs destroyed. Assume a virgin present.
16th June: no eggs, no brood, grumpy. Given a test frame.
23rd June: no EQCs on test frame but nice fat queen seen. I didn't examine the last few frames in the bottom box after I saw & marked her but no brood up to that point.
They've been a bit defensive, I hope they settle down now!
So 5½ weeks from nucing the queen to seeing a (presumably) laying queen.
Difficult to understand what is happening up there.

Basics:

A new queen is ready to mate at 7 days old. It needs 1- 3 good sunny calm days to mate. Temp must be over 20C .

Then the queen lays first eggs after 10 days from birth.

People love to tell about their record queens, but 2 days here or there means nothing.
 
Not a laying queen yet. See how long she lasts, if indeed she comes into lay. I suspect she has had either had limited mating opportunities or was not mated in her prime, and will be superseded sooner rather than later in either eventuality. Please let us know of her outcome.
 
Not a laying queen yet. See how long she lasts, if indeed she comes into lay. I suspect she has had either had limited mating opportunities or was not mated in her prime, and will be superseded sooner rather than later in either eventuality. Please let us know of her outcome.
No one knows about weather, which orders mating flights.
It starts to lay 10 days after emerging if weathers are good for mating.
 
Definitely a laying queen now - sealed brood.
I'm hoping the colony settles down now, they are distinctly defensive!
Glad she is laying. Similar story to yours up here. Nuced the queen on 9th May after finding queen cells in main hive. colony remained calm all the time and I only finally found a plump queen on the 29th July. The weather has been a disaster up here with the odd slightly warmer calm day. Given the vagueries of the weather in my corner I think in future I will be moving any queen cells and brood into a nuc or simply use a snelgrovesque double screen board and vertical techniques.
 

Difficult to understand what is happening up there.

Basics:

A new queen is ready to mate at 7 days old. It needs 1- 3 good sunny calm days to mate. Temp must be over 20C .

Then the queen lays first eggs after 10 days from birth.

People love to tell about their record queens, but 2 days here or there means nothing.
A bit optimistic for here in the East Lancashire Pennines. Two of my successfully mated queens obviously didn't look at the temperature gauge before going out. The only days which touched past 20°C came after they started laying. They would have been lucky to see >15°C and find a patch where it wasn't raining
 
A bit optimistic for here in the East Lancashire Pennines. Two of my successfully mated queens obviously didn't look at the temperature gauge before going out. The only days which touched past 20°C came after they started laying. They would have been lucky to see >15°C and find a patch where it wasn't raining
Yes, I thought the 20c would rule out mating, some Summers altogether!
 
A bit optimistic for here in the East Lancashire Pennines. Two of my successfully mated queens obviously didn't look at the temperature gauge before going out. The only days which touched past 20°C came after they started laying. They would have been lucky to see >15°C and find a patch where it wasn't raining
Yes. Queens will successfully mate with daytime maximums as low as 14 degrees C.
I've witnessed it here myself and I have seen a study where it was confirmed.
 
Yes. Queens will successfully mate with daytime maximums as low as 14 degrees C.
I've witnessed it here myself and I have seen a study where it was confirmed.

WIth Tasnania and Finland there is a difference , how high the sun is shining. How sun heats the bee's body.

In Finland minimun temp is 18C.

The last month when I get mated queens is August.
 
If you read from google real researches about queen mating flights, 20C is ordinary temperature to the happening.

Somehow beekeepers love to select record achievements fron wide data, an thei own queens are best in the world.Queens do what they do and you cannot influence their flight with your positive imagination.

In one research the losses on queens on their mating flights was 20%. I thinkt that it is much.

You surely can find such answers from google as you wish.

I have only 60 years experience about my bees and I still trust on my own eyes.
 
If you read from google real researches about queen mating flights, 20C is ordinary temperature to the happening.

Somehow beekeepers love to select record achievements fron wide data, an thei own queens are best in the world.Queens do what they do and you cannot influence their flight with your positive imagination.

In one research the losses on queens on their mating flights was 20%. I thinkt that it is much.

You surely can find such answers from google as you wish.

I have only 60 years experience about my bees and I still trust on my own eyes.
As I posted earlier I witnessed it first hand some years ago. I can’t be responsible for what others do not see. Given the right conditions with wind speed and so on, mating can occur at 14 degrees. It’s not a moot point.
 

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YEs, I found the same data, this is what it tells about mating temperature. There is many temperatures but NO 14C case. THE TABLE BEGINS from14.

Lowest flight temps are about at 16C.
But it does. You have shown and refer to Figure 5 in the report. That is for the first three flying days only. Figure 6, on the other hand, shows the graph of the nuptial flight duration in relation to the temperature when queens left their nuc. Scroll further down the report.

It is clear that the temperature range of those mating flights is between 14 degrees (actually looks a bit less) and 25 degrees.

This scientist (The Apiarist) discusses the report. See below.

https://theapiarist.org/queen-mating-flights/
 
But it does. You have shown and refer to Figure 5 in the report. That is for the first three flying days only. Figure 6, on the other hand, shows the graph of the nuptial flight duration in relation to the temperature when queens left their nuc. Scroll further down the report.

It is clear that the temperature range of those mating flights is between 14 degrees (actually looks a bit less) and 25 degrees.

This scientist (The Apiarist) discusses the report. See below.

https://theapiarist.org/queen-mating-flights/

As a biologist I use the whole temp scale of temperature. What idea is to inform the coldest temperature where the queen has been seen to mate.

The idea is to give to beekeepers knowledge about normal conditions..

I do not know the meaning of this wondering.
 
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