Melting Honey

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Joined
May 26, 2021
Messages
246
Reaction score
66
Location
Salisbury
Hive Type
WBC
Number of Hives
5
I've read different things in different places. So, what's the maximum temperature one can heat crystalised honey to in order to de-crystalise it, before one risks damaging its quality or rendering it not-honey?
 
Search hmf and that brings up useful threads on the subject
 
You really want to keep it below 35 degrees - which usually means you are heating the environment (water bath or warming cabinet) at around 40 to 45 degrees. How long it will take to liquify rather depends on the quantity and what it's stored in ..jars or buckets.
 
HMF develops as a product of time and temperature. You can get honey quite warm 50C - but not for too long. A large bucket takes a long time for the honey in the middle to become runny again - so it's not necessarily an exact science.
 
a long time for the honey in the middle to become runny again
Yes, a stir after 24 hours helps.

heating the environment (water bath or warming cabinet) at around 40 to 45 degrees
I never really could find out whether heating honey or the air around it was the determining factor. Although hive temp. is roughly 35C, I have a historic memory that 43C was the max. before damage would be done to honey. Maybe that limit meant the air temp should be no more than 43C?
 
Yes, a stir after 24 hours helps.


I never really could find out whether heating honey or the air around it was the determining factor. Although hive temp. is roughly 35C, I have a historic memory that 43C was the max. before damage would be done to honey. Maybe that limit meant the air temp should be no more than 43C?
I've seen 2 methods in the US, both at 103°F, one as a water bath and the other as underfloor heating and air heating combined. Roughly 40°C for 3 days.
 
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