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Vergilius 

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Hi all,


Tried some Manuka honey the other night and it tasted brilliant but I am unsure about the claims that it has "antibacterial content". Does anyone know a genuine reason why Manuka honey is better for us than other varieties of honey. Is it to do with the air quality in New Zealand?




Thanks, Ben P
 
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Do a search for Manuka on the forum and you will find a lot about this debate. It looks as if other honeys have simliar properties but the New Zealanders have put a lot into marketing their honey and have more or less cornered the market on its use in hospitals.
 

tonybloke 

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the book on propolis I'm reading @ the moment seems to put the anti-bacterial properties of honey down to the propolis !!
 
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Enzymes in natural honey in conjunction with warmth and moisture produce hydrogen peroxide, a well known antiseptic, so if the honey is applied to a wound it delivers the hydrogen peroxide exactly where it is needed and air will also be excluded if there is enough honey. I think most honeys will do this. However, I think there are also other mechanisms and factors which is what the Manuka producers play on. No doubt a bit of Googling will find out more, especially on the NZ websites. From what I heard of research being carried out in a Welsh university a number of UK monofloral honeys have simliar properties to Manuka honey but which honeys they are I don't know. There aren't many monofloral honeys produced here so I guess it must be one or more from this list: heather, OSR, borage, clover, and... what else?
 

Debs 

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Went to a really interesting talk at our local BKA on Friday evening by Prof Rose Cooper who is doing research into the antimicrobial properties of honey in wound healing.
She's tested alot of monofloral Welsh honeys and compared to manuka.
Most honey the effect comes from something converted to hydrogen peroxide when it's diluted but that is then neutralised by catalase in the blood.
In manuka it's a different process so isn't inactivated.
 

oliver90owner 

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Himalayan Balsam, field beans, sunflower, ivy, lavender. All mono-floral or nearly so at times.

Regards, RAB
 

Rosti 

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keithgrimes can i borrow your hat as i dont like the stuff either,
Think of it as cod liver oil, so hold your nose and just eat the stuff like a good little boy and keep those NZ bee farmers in the manner to which they've become accustomed!
:drool5:
 

Vergilius 

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Thanks all,

From what I've heard from you it sounds rather dubious that Manuka is any better than our local honey. Rather that the NZ farmers have monopolised the maeket for "health honey". Also, Manuka has to be shipped thousands of miles to get to us so I suppose it is terrible for carbon footprint etc.



Ben P
 

keithgrimes 

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some years ago we had a Wolfhound who was epileptic. On advice from a vet we used about a tablespoon of honey to 'bring him back up' after a fit. The only trouble was he became addicted to the stuff and used to pinch it off the kitchen table (big dogs Wolfhounds).
 

Cazza 

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One of our local vets successfully used normal, in other words not Manuka Honey, to successfully treat a severe infection on a dog recently where antibiotics etc had failed. This was a last resort and the good news is it worked.

Up until I heard this, I had always used Manuka honey on the kids eczema with instant results. Threw the steroid cream away years ago because of this.
I have a customer who supplies horses/carriages for films. He uses my honey on his horses cuts and grazes.
C
 

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