Loving the small dramas and serendipity of beekeeping

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Beebe 

Survivor bee
***
Joined
Jan 18, 2021
Messages
1,512
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1,417
Location
Scotland
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Owned by ten
Having a few healthy (and one unhealthy) colony(s) now makes me a bit more philosophical and less stressed when I mess up, (which is almost every day).
Today I was puzzled to find some sporadic queen-cells above the excluder. One contained a dead pupa, one had a small larva and tickling the end of another one, out sprang a (presumed) queen, and as quick as a flash she was down somewhere in the stack of boxes. I'm assuming that the stack of four honey-supers between the Q+ brood-box and some mystery eggs at the top had induced a Demaree-like, supersedure impulse.

I put those to one side and checked under the excluder....flippin' heck, on the second frame was a big, healthy, honey-coloured queen...the most queenlike queen in my collection. Where's her white spot? I knew it was wearing off, but to be completely clean? Not wanting to risk any fighting, I put her in a nuc alongside a full support team, and moved them away whilst I scratched my head. I decided to remove the QX and give the interloper I had briefly glimpsed, a chance to try her luck in this big hive.

Later, I was examining a swarm that had settled in my bait-hive a couple of weeks ago; I was pretty smug with this lot as I thought they were my first complete free-bees. The queen showed up, as in the other hive, on the second frame; but I recognise her face...she's the original queen from the other hive!

Now, I have a detailed diary of the dates, and descriptions of what I saw and did, which includes any misgivings or mistakes I think I might have made. But despite that, all I know is that a swarm was involved and that a queen was put in the wrong place. As to what happened when and where I cannot put the jigsaw together. But other than trying not to repeat my mistakes in the future, it doesn't really matter. What I am learning is that the bees will survive despite my "help".
 

The Poot 

Drone Bee
***
Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Messages
1,406
Reaction score
1,448
Location
Dorset
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Only 2 now
Having a few healthy (and one unhealthy) colony(s) now makes me a bit more philosophical and less stressed when I mess up, (which is almost every day).
Today I was puzzled to find some sporadic queen-cells above the excluder. One contained a dead pupa, one had a small larva and tickling the end of another one, out sprang a (presumed) queen, and as quick as a flash she was down somewhere in the stack of boxes. I'm assuming that the stack of four honey-supers between the Q+ brood-box and some mystery eggs at the top had induced a Demaree-like, supersedure impulse.

I put those to one side and checked under the excluder....flippin' heck, on the second frame was a big, healthy, honey-coloured queen...the most queenlike queen in my collection. Where's her white spot? I knew it was wearing off, but to be completely clean? Not wanting to risk any fighting, I put her in a nuc alongside a full support team, and moved them away whilst I scratched my head. I decided to remove the QX and give the interloper I had briefly glimpsed, a chance to try her luck in this big hive.

Later, I was examining a swarm that had settled in my bait-hive a couple of weeks ago; I was pretty smug with this lot as I thought they were my first complete free-bees. The queen showed up, as in the other hive, on the second frame; but I recognise her face...she's the original queen from the other hive!

Now, I have a detailed diary of the dates, and descriptions of what I saw and did, which includes any misgivings or mistakes I think I might have made. But despite that, all I know is that a swarm was involved and that a queen was put in the wrong place. As to what happened when and where I cannot put the jigsaw together. But other than trying not to repeat my mistakes in the future, it doesn't really matter. What I am learning is that the bees will survive despite my "help".
Thanks for sharing this Beebe - I thought it was only me that’s challenged by jigsaw puzzles! The bees certainly know how to keep us on our toes, but as you say, survive and thrive despite us! I wish your interloper every success.
 
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