Inteoducing a laying Queen

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I have a strong Nuc but it has a varroa and chalkbrood problem. Can I do a Bailey comb change and introduce a new laying queen in a q cage at the same time. Then I can treat the phoretic mites.
I am getting rid of the old
 

Ian123 

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First off simply changing the queen should sort your chalk brood issue as long as she’s not genetically inclined to it as well. As you say she’s laying I assume she’s from another of your hives. I’ve introduced queens with strip treatments in with no issues before. But realistically I’d avoid if possible, if for no other reason it’s something else foreign in the hive. So why risk it. Do you have the equipment for a vape or 2 before introducing?
 

Boston Bees 

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Could one thing (varroa) be making the other more likely (chalkbrood)? Due to the increased stress the colony is under?

Have you treated this year? If not I would stick an Apivar strip in there for 8 weeks first to deal with the varroa, then see how they are? (vaping another option if you have the kit of course)

Bailey comb change is a gradual thing anyway, so wouldn't do what you want, I think
 

madasafish 

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Personally I would treat first and requeen afterwards...Both are stressful for bees. You want your new Q to have every chance of success.

Chalkbrood often disappears with warmer weather.. (!!)
 

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Could one thing (varroa) be making the other more likely (chalkbrood)? Due to the increased stress the colony is under?

Have you treated this year? If not I would stick an Apivar strip in there for 8 weeks first to deal with the varroa, then see how they are? (vaping another option if you have the kit of course)

Bailey comb change is a gradual thing anyway, so wouldn't do what you want, I think
Apiguard given in August and OA vape in Dec
 

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First off simply changing the queen should sort your chalk brood issue as long as she’s not genetically inclined to it as well. As you say she’s laying I assume she’s from another of your hives. I’ve introduced queens with strip treatments in with no issues before. But realistically I’d avoid if possible, if for no other reason it’s something else foreign in the hive. So why risk it. Do you have the equipment for a vape or 2 before introducing?
I have a gasvap
 

Ian123 

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Apiguard given in August and OA vape in Dec
Given that why do you say a high varroa load or one worth treating, are you seeing dwv or a high drop. If you are concerned I’d give a couple of vapes see what drop you get and then introduce your queen if you get a limited result.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Can I do a Bailey comb change and introduce a new laying queen in a q cage at the same time. Then I can treat the phoretic mites
A Bailey change is going to achieve the far end of bugger all I'm afraid, if it's a 'strong' nuc, hiving it will mean that half the frames will be new anyway - you can swap the rest gradually as the season progresses your first priority is to adrress the varroa, then assess how bad the chalkbrood issue really is.
 

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Given that why do you say a high varroa load or one worth treating, are you seeing dwv or a high drop. If you are concerned I’d give a couple of vapes see what drop you get and then introduce your queen if you get a limited result.
No dwv. Lots of mites in drone comb
 

Hebeegeebee 

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You could use MAQS first - no worries if the queen keels over in the process!
MAQS only takes a week. I would be inclined to leave it a few days after removing the stuff before then introducing a new queen to ensure any fumes are long gone.
 

Finman 

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Could one thing (varroa) be making the other more likely (chalkbrood)? Due to the increased stress the colony is under?
Varroa does not make chalkbrood. Recent queen is chalkbrood sentive.

But it is known that varroa has some connection chalkbrood. Varroa arrival made chalkbrood in many countries very bad 30 years ago.

In South Africa chalkbrood was not known before varroa.
 

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