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Honey tank heater

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VEG 

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After doing a cut out the other day I now have about 30lb of honey to get out of wild comb. I started crushing it to strain but it is going VERY slowly. So I started thinking of putting some sort of heating cable around my tank so that it warms up the tank and honey so it strains quicker. I am not going to pay bee shop prices so what can I use to speed up the flow of the mashed honey. I have seen home brew heaters but cant find out the temperature they work at. I also thought of an electric blanket wrapped around it.
 

Poly Hive 

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Make yourself a honey warmer.

Old freezer, 40 watt bulb if you can still find one, a cheap thermo stat I used to use an imersion heather one but such stuff is very cheap these days for a good one and off you go.

Pay you back times over it will for the little effort it takes.

PH
 

jimbeekeeper 

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Following on from PH's solution if you do not have a fridge to hand , might be a 100w light bulb (or a couple) just above the surface of your tank , they get quite hot.
 
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VEG 

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Not got room for a warming cabinet at the moment. I need something I can use quickly as I have allready started doing this honey. :cheers2:

What sort of temperature will I need to go to?
 

jigsaw 

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Have you thought about a thermostatically controlled aquarium heater? Just an idea.
 

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Dont want anything to go into the honey. I need something that will go around the settling tank with inbuilt strainer (this is where the mashed up honey comb is).
 
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I think you need to heat it to at least 35C to get it reasonably runny, ideally quite a bit more. This won't melt the wax but the honey should flow out of the comb better. 30 lbs isn't a lot so you could try standing the bucket in hot water. The bath filled with hot water out of the tap and then regularly topped up with hot water from the kettle. Even this will take several hours I fear.

A simple warming cabinet can be made out of sheets of 50mm rigid insulation. You don't even need to tape the sheets together - just put a luggage strap around the four sides, standing on a bit as a floor then balance a bit on the top.
 

Poly Hive 

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http://www.beedata.com/data2/cleaning_marketing_honey.html

"A variety of "warm spots" has been useful to beekeepers for generations - beside the oven, in the airing cupboard, adjacent to a radiator, even in a sunny window. The most reliable method is a honey warming cabinet made with thick insulation, with a low-powered heater inside, commonly a light bulb, but now more likely to be a special heating element with electronic control. Taking either one or two buckets, or a stack of 1 lb jars, the degranulation can be



easily controlled.

Most honeys can be liquefied at a temperature of 43°C, but oil seed rape will stubbornly remain solid until 48° or 49°C. When liquefying full buckets, it helps to stir the bucket from time to time, to break up the solid central mass. When dealing with oil seed rape, a layer of large crystals may remain when all the rest is liquid. It is as well to pour off the liquid portion, than to persist with trying to liquefy everything. The crystals can either be tipped into the next bucket, or fed to the bees. "

PH
 

VEG 

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I had a look at the brewing belts but it gives no info on what temp they work at.
 

DulwichGnome 

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"How it Works
The air temperature in various situations in which you may place your fermenting vessel can range from 5'C to 24'C (41'F to 75'F). It is necessary to move the position of the heating belt to be higher, or lower, to enable you to maintain the temperature you require i.e. between 20'C and 24'C (68'F to 75'F) for beer."

http://www.homebrew4u.co.uk/homebrew-equipment/brew-belt-universal.asp

A heating belt used to keep the temperature of your brew up to proper temperature when fermenting in cooler temperatures. These belts normally produce about 20 watts and their position on the bucket or carboy determine the amount of heat is put into your brew. The lower the belt is on the fermenting vessel the more heat is absorbed.

It will maintain 75 to 80 temperatures for beer or wine for up to 8 days.


These cautions appear on the packaging of this product:

DO NOT leave the belt plugged in for more than 8 consecutive days.

DO NOT cover the belt with a blanket or any other covering. This could cause it to overheat.

DO NOT store flammable objects near the belt while in use.

DO NOT use the belt in a room temperature that rises above 75.

DO NOT attempt to attach the belt to a glass, metal or wooden fermenter.

http://www.ebrew.com/miscellaneous_equipment/brew_belt.htm
 
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Poly Hive 

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As you dinna have the time to make anything I would suggest mashing it up and putting the bucket somewhere warm, ie the airing cupboard and then filter it through a mesh.

Or.... warm it and borrow a heather press.

PH
 

DulwichGnome 

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I did hear of someone using a mincing machine and then letting it settle out before filtering, might be worth a try?

Mike.
 

Poly Hive 

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If you were a bit closer Veg I'd lend you my spin drier, which makes short work of that sort of issue.

PH
 

VEG 

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Poly Hive whats this about a spin dryer?
I have a new electric extractor is there any way that this could be used to spin the mashed up comb??
 

DulwichGnome 

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Could try putting the comb in a cappings bag or some extractors have a cage which you put in them.

Mike.
 

victor meldrew 

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Have you thought about a thermostatically controlled aquarium heater? Just an idea.
Not a good idea:(. honey is a good insulator, what happens is that the honey in contact with the heater caramelises before conduction can dissipate the heat through the bulk of the honey.
better sticking with a heat belt or a cheap warming pad intended for placing under a fermenting vessel :).

John Wilkinson
 

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