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Honey starting to granulate

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SixFooter 

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I've sold all my honey and I stared to bottle it today to deliver tomorrow. About 1/2 way down the buckets, the honey gets more viscous and I guess is starting to granulate.
Do I need to heat treat it or could I just deliver it as is? Some jars of honey will be more runny than others, but it is all spreadable and tastes OK. I extracted it about 5 weeks ago.
 

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Whats the temp of the buckets ?
was it stored indoors ?
 

oliver90owner 

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I would homogenise the total bucket at least.

The only time I've suffered from fermentation was when I didn't use all from a part-melted bucket. Never again.

Yours may not be a problem, but.....

Regards, RAB
 

Vergilius 

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In my opinion semi-granulated honey tastes great and has a really good texture.

Ben P
 

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Is there any point putting the jars on a radiator say when the heating is on?
 

Vergilius 

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It was stored indoors.
Whatever the temperature all honey (aside from ivy and heather) granulates eventually.
I assume the honey you are talking about is not rape as that would obviously have crystalised a long time ago. It really depends on the volume you are selling and to who you are selling it. It sounds as if you are not just selling to family and friends so you may want to follow RAB's advice of heating and homogenising to keep standards.


Ben P
 

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I'd recommend a warming cabinet for full homogenisation. You will be better off without hot spots and small batch reliquification. I have improvised a warming cabinet with an empty wardrobe (or cupboard) with a low power heater (note low power to avoid hot spots as above). You are probably aware of 'HMF' - not a good thing in honey, and it is accumulative, with prolonged elevated temperature (or hot spots already mentioned). Gently does it.
 

oliver90owner 

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Boys and girls. Please don't misquote. I did not mention any need for 6 footer to heat his honey. Full stop.

The whole is in a satisfactory state for bottling, according to six footer. The only issue, as far as I can see, is the possible need to homogenise the honey and I did not even say it was a 'must do'. Just that I would not take the risk of some of the jars fermenting.

Further, heating and fully liquidising may lead to a very coarse granular crystallisation next time it granulates.

RAB
 

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RAB

Am I missing something here? How do you homogenise without heating the honey?


Ben P
 

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Stir it?

Never mixed a dry mortar? Hogenised milk still contains fatand milk solids?

Never mixed a cake mix?

You don't need to liquidise it to homogenise it.

An emulsion can be homogenous but may well separate into fractions on standing, which also reminds me of emulsion paint as another example.

The dictionary says 'uniform'. We have to look at this as a scientific term, perhaps, less of a loose conversational style.

Regards, RAB
 

SixFooter 

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Boys and girls. Please don't misquote. I did not mention any need for 6 footer to heat his honey. Full stop.

The whole is in a satisfactory state for bottling, according to six footer. The only issue, as far as I can see, is the possible need to homogenise the honey and I did not even say it was a 'must do'. Just that I would not take the risk of some of the jars fermenting.

Further, heating and fully liquidising may lead to a very coarse granular crystallisation next time it granulates.



RAB
Thanks Rab.
If it will probably be OK, I'll just deliver the promised 50 jars tomorrow.
The honey in the buckets will flow into the jars from a ladle, but I have some more in a settling tank which has set like jelly and isnt pourable, so I'll probably need to heat that.
 

Vergilius 

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Stir it?

Never mixed a dry mortar? Hogenised milk still contains fatand milk solids?

Never mixed a cake mix?

You don't need to liquidise it to homogenise it.

An emulsion can be homogenous but may well separate into fractions on standing, which also reminds me of emulsion paint as another example.

The dictionary says 'uniform'. We have to look at this as a scientific term, perhaps, less of a loose conversational style.

Regards, RAB


Thanks.

Ben P
 
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If you are selling the honey to shops and the bottom half of the jars ends up crystalised and the top half liquid I fear it will not be wildly popular amongst the customers. Appearance matters to most of the buying public which is why the supermarkets have beauty contests for things like tomatos. Illogical though this may be to the purists.

If it had taken several months to reach the semi-liquid state described then I would warm it through until it is all liquid, taking the temp up to about 45C for a short period to ensure all the sugar crystals are melted, otherwise it will recrystalise quickly. It should then stay liquid in the jars for a few months. A bright, clear honey always sells.

An alternative approach assuming the setting has happend slowly, would be to bottle the top half which is liquid now as this is likely to be high in fructose and therefore stay liquid for longer. The bottom set half is likely to be glucose and can be sold as soft set.

Of course there is always a few buyers for "artisan" honey with lumps in it - but it all depends on your market.
 

SixFooter 

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If you are selling the honey to shops and the bottom half of the jars ends up crystalised and the top half liquid I fear it will not be wildly popular amongst the customers. Appearance matters to most of the buying public which is why the supermarkets have beauty contests for things like tomatos. Illogical though this may be to the purists.

If it had taken several months to reach the semi-liquid state described then I would warm it through until it is all liquid, taking the temp up to about 45C for a short period to ensure all the sugar crystals are melted, otherwise it will recrystalise quickly. It should then stay liquid in the jars for a few months. A bright, clear honey always sells.

An alternative approach assuming the setting has happend slowly, would be to bottle the top half which is liquid now as this is likely to be high in fructose and therefore stay liquid for longer. The bottom set half is likely to be glucose and can be sold as soft set.

Of course there is always a few buyers for "artisan" honey with lumps in it - but it all depends on your market.
Too late now, I mixed it up but I'll make a warming cabinet for the next batch. btw is there anything in beekeeping that the experts agree on!
 

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