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Honey bee Anatomy

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Bcrazy 

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I have a number of photos that I have taken of the internal and external anatomy of our honey bees.
If any member/s would like me to show them I can do, but I do not want to hog the Microscopy section on this Forum.

Regards;
 

admin 

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Hogging and being an expert is 2 seperate things Bcrazy.
Please carry on as we are all learning from you.
 

Polyanwood 

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here, here. Ignorance isn't bliss!
 

admin 

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Bcrazy I deleted your last post as requested and have increased the attachment number from 5 to 20,give me a shout if I can be of any help.
 

Bcrazy 

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Firstly I would like to thank admin for extending certain items on this Forum.

Anatomy.
I would like to start off by showing you the basic externalanatomy of the Honey bee. Once I have done that I (hopefully) will show photos of individual partsof the bee with an explanation.
On the first shots I have omitted the legs and wings as I will treat these as separate organs.

If at any time you hve a question please ask away.










More to floow in a moment.

Regards;
 

Bcrazy 

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Sorry about that.






The next post I will be focusing on the head of the bee.

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Widdershins 

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Wow, marvellous!

Thanks SO much for doing this, we all appreciate it!
 

Bcrazy 

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Part 2 Head.









Only allowed 4 images Admin please sort. Thanks.



The next set will be about the Thorax.

If you have any questions regarding the anatomy please feel free to ask, if I don't know it, I know a man that does.
 

Bcrazy 

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Pt II





That's all folks.

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Polyanwood 

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great photos. Thanks Bcrazy. I am facinated by the hairy eyes. What are people's theories about why they are hairy?
 

Bcrazy 

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hairy eyes

I have read Snodgrass and there is no information why the bees have hairy eyes but.........
In the publication Form and Function of the Honey bee by Lesley Godman it gives a brief mention about the hairs.

The hairs are called mechanosensory hairs, these hairs are set in sockets and innervated at the base of the shaft. The neuron is stimulated by movement so that the bee is aware of anything touching the surface of the eye.
I have also read somewhere that as the age of the bee develops the hairs on the eyes become dislodged and therefore foraging bees do not have as many as a house bee.
This is what I like about anatomy I can learn something every time I approach the subject.

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admin 

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Maybe house bees dont see to well?
 

Bcrazy 

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From Admin
Maybe house bees don't see to well?
House bees live in a world of darkness, touch and pheromones, so at their stage of life they don't need good eyesight. They become accustomed to light by the 'Just going to the loo' flights as they do not stray far from the hive. You can always tell a house bee as it spirals up wards then returns to the hive.

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admin 

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I think one of the best bits of beekeeping is sitting with a sandwich on a summer lunchtime seeing the new bees taking first flights.
 

Polyanwood 

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i think one of the best things about beekeeping is sitting next to the hive on a Summer evening and hearing the hum and smelling the nectar... close to Heaven!

If you live in the dark and the hairs on the eyes allow the bee to feel then that would make sense that they were worth having as a nurse bee and would not be worth keeping later
 
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