Hive preservatives

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Greatbigchicken 

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I'm sure there has been much debate on this before, but I've had a quick look and can't find the correct thread.

I've got 2 cedar hives and was wondering what, if anything I should preserve them with. I like the natural wood colour so don't really want to paint or stain them, I was wondering about oils. Also can the hives be treated with the bees still inside??
 

richardbees 

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The Cuprinol range is bee tested friendly...

To be honest, I like the look of Cedar untreated!
 

drstitson 

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"The Cuprinol range is bee tested friendly..."

richardbees

unless you know of some official data that we are not privy to here is the message that has been on the cuprinol website for 18 months and widely publicised in beekeeping circles:

"New formulations have not been tested for use on beehives and as a result Cuprinol cannot recommend any of its wood preservers on beehives."

in reality almost certainly/probably just as safe as it ever was BUT the makers can't made those sort of claims.
 

Busy Bee 

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"The Cuprinol range is bee tested friendly..."

richardbees

unless you know of some official data that we are not privy to here is the message that has been on the cuprinol website for 18 months and widely publicised in beekeeping circles:

"New formulations have not been tested for use on beehives and as a result Cuprinol cannot recommend any of its wood preservers on beehives."

in reality almost certainly/probably just as safe as it ever was BUT the makers can't made those sort of claims.
I have seen an apiary with all hives treated with crresote:eek: with no ill effects at all. Pity the bees though

Busy Bee
 

MrB 

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I use rustins boiled linseed oil mixed with a bit of bees wax (Thanks Bros for the tip) :)
 

Headnavigator 

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I use rustins boiled linseed oil mixed with a bit of bees wax (Thanks Bros for the tip) :)
:iagree: keeps the colour rather than letting it go silver. First season with mine, guess it'll need a coat a couple of times a year from now on.
 

viridens 

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I am 6 months into a trial of beeswax/Rape oil mixture instead of the usual expensive linseed. It seems to be doing well so far. Although in theory the oil won't 'dry' like linseed, it has either soaked in or oxidised to leave a good waxy protective layer.
Note. The product labelled 'vegetable oil' by most supermarkets is actually 100% Rapeseed. I would guess that Sunflower and Olive oil etc would work too - All cheap enough to try.

Recipe - I just melted the wax into heated oil. By adjusting the amount you can get a 'paint' applied by brush, or a paste to rub on. The paste is useful for filling small cracks etc. Good enough to eat! :)
 

The Apprentices 

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Anyone ever tried natural Tung Oil.

Or 50-50 beeswax and Neatsfoot Oil.
 
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fredbloggs 

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I see frequently the statement that cedar has "natural oils" and the implication that as a result the wood is seemingly "everlasting". These oils whilst reacting against metal fastenings do nothing to stop wood cracking, splitting etc when exposed to winters like the last one. As the owner of a few split sided cedar hives, i feel it necessary to point out that if you value your cedar hives and want to leave them in your will, this wood needs treating (as opposed to painting). Oil of some description will greatly improve the longevity no end ( plus help to retain the original colour).

There is much info on the web regarding linseed and the merits of boiled over raw. I would personal prefer linseed over other oils. The cost is not great when compared to value of box replacement.

There is also the matter of application, with the watchword being a thin mix that absorbs into the wood (a primer?) that is applied with the excess removed by wiping off. This is preferable to copious amounts slapped on that drys leaving a film. I would suggest that the addition of wax adds to this effect hindering subsequent topup applications.

Some further research required. Bewarned though, this "web wallowing" not only detracts from other pursuits such as beekeeping, it inevitably leads via natural wood coverings to "Paint " information that you might rather not know about!

Regards

FB
 

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