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Boston Bees 

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I'm afraid I can't make head nor tail of what is being said here. :calmdown:
"AMM bees are prone to chalkbrood"
"Oh no they're not"
"Oh yes they are"
"Oh no they're not"
"Oh yes they are"
"You're silly"
"No, YOU'RE silly"
"Na na na na na na na na na"

Hope this clarifies things.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Too many - but not nearly enough
AMM in general - let's not blame one breeder, I have quite a few of his queens and am quite happy with them, but sometimes the chalkiness gets a bit worrying
 

Curly green finger's 

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I wondered. Others have reported the same. Are you taking her through winter?
It would be good if you did
I'm taking three through winter the fourth has superseded.
Can we have a bit more info on chalkbrood? What causes chalkbrood?
 

gmonag 

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I'm taking three through winter the fourth has superseded.
Can we have a bit more info on chalkbrood? What causes chalkbrood?
From Beebase:


Chalkbrood
Cause
Chalkbrood is caused by the fungus Ascosphaera apis. When ingested by the larva it penetrates the gut wall to absorb nutrients. As the spores germinate and multiply, the larva eventually dies of starvation. After a few days of growth, the larva and fungus swells and fills the brood cell where it will eventually harden after a few days to its distinctive 'mummified' appearance. Here it adopts a mottled white and black colour and each chalkbrood mummy will produce millions of infective spores which stick to the cells, hive components and adult bees.

Symptoms
Typical symptoms will start to appear in early spring as the colony starts to build up its population. Conditions such as damp and cold weather will promote fungal spores. Symptoms of chalkbrood include:
  • Initially the dead larvae will be covered with a white cotton wool-like growth and may swell to fill the cell taking on its shape;
  • After a time these will dry out and shrink to give the characteristic ‘mummies’ that are chalk-like at first turning to a greyish black colour as the fungal fruiting bodies develop;
  • Worker bees uncap the cells of dead larvae so the mummies will be clearly visible;
  • Shrunken chalk-like mummies in the brood and in and around the hive entrance.
  • As the condition worsens, infected hives will also show a pepper pot brood pattern;
  • If mummies are still contained in capped cells, when a comb is shaken gently the mummies may be heard rattling in the cells.
Spread
A. apis is highly infectious and can be easily spread between hives through robbing and drifting of drones and worker bees. Spores can be transferred between apiaries on contaminated equipment and through the intervention of the beekeeper.

Treatment
Chalkbrood is not usually a serious disease among strong healthy colonies. However, in smaller colonies or those under stress (for example suffering heavy Varroa infestations) it can become a problem. The best method for keeping chalkbrood to a minimum is the maintenance of good strong stocks which appear better able to resist the fungus. Those colonies which are susceptible can be re-queened. Avoiding damp apiary sites will also help to minimise the effect of chalkbrood in colonies.
 

Curly green finger's 

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From Beebase:


Chalkbrood
Cause
Chalkbrood is caused by the fungus Ascosphaera apis. When ingested by the larva it penetrates the gut wall to absorb nutrients. As the spores germinate and multiply, the larva eventually dies of starvation. After a few days of growth, the larva and fungus swells and fills the brood cell where it will eventually harden after a few days to its distinctive 'mummified' appearance. Here it adopts a mottled white and black colour and each chalkbrood mummy will produce millions of infective spores which stick to the cells, hive components and adult bees.

Symptoms
Typical symptoms will start to appear in early spring as the colony starts to build up its population. Conditions such as damp and cold weather will promote fungal spores. Symptoms of chalkbrood include:
  • Initially the dead larvae will be covered with a white cotton wool-like growth and may swell to fill the cell taking on its shape;
  • After a time these will dry out and shrink to give the characteristic ‘mummies’ that are chalk-like at first turning to a greyish black colour as the fungal fruiting bodies develop;
  • Worker bees uncap the cells of dead larvae so the mummies will be clearly visible;
  • Shrunken chalk-like mummies in the brood and in and around the hive entrance.
  • As the condition worsens, infected hives will also show a pepper pot brood pattern;
  • If mummies are still contained in capped cells, when a comb is shaken gently the mummies may be heard rattling in the cells.
Spread
A. apis is highly infectious and can be easily spread between hives through robbing and drifting of drones and worker bees. Spores can be transferred between apiaries on contaminated equipment and through the intervention of the beekeeper.

Treatment
Chalkbrood is not usually a serious disease among strong healthy colonies. However, in smaller colonies or those under stress (for example suffering heavy Varroa infestations) it can become a problem. The best method for keeping chalkbrood to a minimum is the maintenance of good strong stocks which appear better able to resist the fungus. Those colonies which are susceptible can be re-queened. Avoiding damp apiary sites will also help to minimise the effect of chalkbrood in colonies.
Thanks for sharing, I asked more so for maybe the newbs reading the thread.
 

Curly green finger's 

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"AMM bees are prone to chalkbrood"
"Oh no they're not"
"Oh yes they are"
"Oh no they're not"
"Oh yes they are"
"You're silly"
"No, YOU'RE silly"
"Na na na na na na na na na"

Hope this clarifies things.
There's a number 1 hit there above in the beekeeper's world I'll buy a copy... I'll even help write the song with you perhaps play some rhythm guitar????
Thoughts:laughing-smiley-004
 

Ian123 

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Anybody know when chalk brood was first reported
No idea I’d imagine it’s been there since year dot. The easiest cure for chalkbrood is change the queen, personally I’d question any breeder that consistently has the issue. Ian
 

Hebeegeebee 

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No idea I’d imagine it’s been there since year dot. The easiest cure for chalkbrood is change the queen, personally I’d question any breeder that consistently has the issue. Ian
Yes, I have seen that chalkbrood follows the queen. I haven't had it for a few years however the suggestion is to replace the comb to stop it happeneing again. I don't think that's necessary.
 

Ian123 

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Yes, I have seen that chalkbrood follows the queen. I haven't had it for a few years however the suggestion is to replace the comb to stop it happeneing again. I don't think that's necessary.
Yes comb change is often recommended but came to the conclusion many years ago it’s pretty pointless as it’s the queen genetics that play a major role. A change can simply stop it on the next brood round and don’t use a related queen if you expect to stop the issue. I’ve not seen it for some time and it’s not normally an issue you see in progeny from proper breeders.
 

Polymorph 

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I'm taking three through winter the fourth has superseded.
Can we have a bit more info on chalkbrood? What causes chalkbrood?
Interesting, I've have one of JGs queens in a nuc which they've tried to supercede twice, however I'm not taking seriously until the old guard have died off and it's just her offspring. Is this the approach others take?
 

Swarm 

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Interesting, I've have one of JGs queens in a nuc which they've tried to supercede twice, however I'm not taking seriously until the old guard have died off and it's just her offspring. Is this the approach others take?
This year I've found the bees seem more determined than previous years. If she is still there and laying well, I'd do the same, this is just the bees objecting to change.
 

REDWOOD 

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I haven’t had chalk brood since I moved apiaries. It is at a lower altitude and warmer.
 

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