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wightbees 

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What thickness is the wood that is used to make frames .
And What is your most used and why please.
I like the look of H frames and M frames because i think the both are self spacing.
 

MuswellMetro 

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What thickness is the wood that is used to make frames .
And What is your most used and why please.
I like the look of H frames and M frames because i think the both are self spacing.

Wight, i have PM you
 

wightbees 

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Hi muswellmetro
No pm showing ?
 

wightbees 

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Ahhh it's a bit slow it's there now lol
 

MuswellMetro 

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Ahhh it's a bit slow it's there now lol
look, you young youngster, you have to allow us oldies, time, i first worked on computor in Algo 60...60= eg 1960, so this modern instance is a bit to fast for me, Vista, Windows 7, nay lad, this PC works on Windows 3.1 workgroups, why? because it runs my O Gauge model railways and i cannot program it in GWbasic any other way....note oldie playing with large trains not oo not N scale..too old to learn new tricks

and dont worry i do have a windows 7 laptop but that only used downstairs
 
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admin 

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Windows 7 :svengo:
I have not got as far as Vista yet,I still run xp..
 
T

Tom Bick 

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I have just bought a new laptop and had it down graded to XP
 

DulwichGnome 

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look, you young youngster, you have to allow us oldies, time, i first worked on computor in Algo 60...60= eg 1960, so this modern instance is a bit to fast for me, Vista, Windows 7, nay lad, this PC works on Windows 3.1 workgroups, why? because it runs my O Gauge model railways and i cannot program it in GWbasic any other way....note oldie playing with large trains not oo not N scale..too old to learn new tricks

and dont worry i do have a windows 7 laptop but that only used downstairs
Best start putting by some old HDs,
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8557144.stm
 

wilderness 

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totally off topic but I still have an IBM PC running OS/2. 20Mb hard disk and 1Mb RAM.

The OP must be fuming :toetap05::toetap05: that his thread has been hijacked by a load of old crusties talking about the old days.
 

wilderness 

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What thickness is the wood that is used to make frames .
And What is your most used and why please.
I like the look of H frames and M frames because i think the both are self spacing.
back on topic ...

I use Hoffman frames in the brood box and Manley in the supers. I still have some Hoffman super frames and occasionally I get a mix in a super.

The reason I use Hoffman in the brood box is that they are self-spacing so no messing around with spacers. The surface contact between adjacent frames is small so it is easy to break the propolis that the bees use in the brood box. The top bar I use is 1 1/16" (27mm) as I'm on 14x12 frames and I've been told the top bar needs the extra strength

Manleys have parallel side bars so it is easy to run your uncapping knife down them. Propolis is not so much of a problem in the supers. The top bar for the supers is 7/8" (22mm)

I'm using National hives.
 

Onge 

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MuswellMetro 

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back on topic ...

I use Hoffman frames in the brood box and Manley in the supers. I still have some Hoffman super frames and occasionally I get a mix in a super.

The reason I use Hoffman in the brood box is that they are self-spacing so no messing around with spacers. The surface contact between adjacent frames is small so it is easy to break the propolis that the bees use in the brood box. The top bar I use is 1 1/16" (27mm) as I'm on 14x12 frames and I've been told the top bar needs the extra strength

Manleys have parallel side bars so it is easy to run your uncapping knife down them. Propolis is not so much of a problem in the supers. The top bar for the supers is 7/8" (22mm)

I'm using National hives.

When i tried Manleys, i found the Bees did not draw the foundation that well, i assume as the bee space is wider

i prefer SN1 on staggered wide spacers--11 frames per super to draw foundation then re space to non staggered spacers at 8 frames per super for honey

and being a nutter use 37mm spacers with 35mm 14x12 hoffmans once drawn out...just like the extra space in the brood the 2mm give...dont roll so many bees putting back brood frames
 
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I've just put Windows 7 on a new PC and am mightily impressed. It is the 64 bit version as I needed 8GB of RAM for handling large graphic files and all the other systems, including Linux I believe, are only 32 bit and therefore can't address more than about 3.5GB. It has been very stable and is very quick to start and shut down. Only issue was getting it to join an existing XP based network. It works now but it took a bit of head scratching. Main problem was XP calls the network MSHOME by default and Windows 7 calls it HOMEGROUP and the settings for changing from the default name were well tucked away in Windows 7.
 

Poly Hive 

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Win 7 has some nasty tricks and I have had the dreaded blue screen 3 times so far so its not that stable.

Looks pretty but Ubantu does all the same stuff at no cost.

I have posted before about getting Manley frames drawn out and to assist that process I like to have a few hoffman ones to reduce the spacing.

PH
 

Hombre 

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I've just put Windows 7 on a new PC and am mightily impressed. It is the 64 bit version as I needed 8GB of RAM for handling large graphic files and all the other systems, including Linux I believe, are only 32 bit and therefore can't address more than about 3.5GB. It has been very stable and is very quick to start and shut down. Only issue was getting it to join an existing XP based network. It works now but it took a bit of head scratching. Main problem was XP calls the network MSHOME by default and Windows 7 calls it HOMEGROUP and the settings for changing from the default name were well tucked away in Windows 7.
I think that you will find that Linux kernel was 64 bit ready well before Windows and AMD shortly before Intel. Here is the page

There is a reason why the top 10 fastest super computers on the globe run Linux (not out of the box of course) and memory access is one of them.

This is the significant part:
Linux was the first operating system kernel to run the x86-64 architecture in long mode, starting with the 2.4 version (prior to the physical hardware's availability).[15][16] Linux also provides backward compatibility for running 32-bit executables. This permits programs to be recompiled into long mode while retaining the use of 32-bit programs. Several Linux distributions currently ship with x86-64-native kernels and userlands. Some, such as SUSE, Mandriva and Debian GNU/Linux, package both 32-bit and 64-bit systems on a single DVD-ROM image to allow automatic selection of the best software during installation. Other distributions, such as Fedora, Ubuntu, and Arch Linux, are available in one version compiled for a 32-bit architecture and another compiled for a 64-bit architecture.

There is an attempt to run kernel in compatibility mode and to be able to run 64 bit applications in a 32 bit kernel. Name of this project is LINUX PAE64 [2].

64-bit Linux allows up to 128 TB (140,737,488,355,328 bytes) of address space for individual processes, and can address approximately 64 TB (70,368,744,177,664 bytes) of physical memory, subject to processor and system limitations.
 

wightbees 

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How long is a piece of string
Or put it another way, how many Hackers run Windows = 000
There's a reason for this , it's full of security issues.
Linux is far better than windows also it's open source
Gates was wanting this i believe but was turned down lol
and his own words :
At a hastily convened press conference Bill Gates announced that he personally thinks that "Linux is the best OS ever."


Now can we get back to my frames issues please before i restort to boring you all with Linux, of which has a browser now also which makes it even better to use also you can use duel boot OS so just partion your HD and use your pc for both OS .
Best of both worlds LOL

Now Frames
 

Hombre 

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Sorry for the divert.

I have little to contribute to your original question, but having waxed lyrical off thread, I feel obliged to make as positive contribution as I can, from my limited experience. :)

This year I will be using all 14x12 frames. I noticed last year that with such deep frames, when the hive is not on level ground, that the frames were apt to want to hang vertically and so not square in the box. Also that any burr comb on the side of the box had a tendency to allow the bottom end of the frame to drag a little.

I will be paying more attention to ensuring hives are on a fully level footing this season.
 

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