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aseeryl 

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One of my splits, mentioned in other posts, has been slow to take off. I put in 2 frames of capped, with due to hatch, brood last week.

Had a look yesterday and the numbers have increased visibly with more to come. However, because the hive was queenless for several weeks, the numbers of bees originally present has dwindled considerably. Hence, there seems to be very little flying activity. The vast majority of bees will be housebound newbies (sic). No doubt consuming the little stores present,so I've put on a small amount of syrup (about 1 pint).

Anyway, I was at the bee club at the weekend and one chap suggested an old trick for weak hives was to put it in the place of a "normal" hive for a day and collect foragers as they return. They would become part of the new hive. I've heard of this on a small scale, drift etc, but what would be the reactions to a mass invasion.

I was worried that that there would be fighting and that newcomers could kill the queen. They might was the reply, so question is anyone any experience of this kind of scenario?
 

oliver90owner 

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put it in the place of a "normal" hive for a day

No problem with newcomers, with acceptance by the colony, them bearing gifts of nectar or pollen.

Question is what happens tomorrow when you put it back? They all go home and possibly realise there is a robbing opportunity (particularly if any feed is left on). OK if you move it into an apiary for a day and then move it out again. It would collect all the foragers from the other hive if it was a full day of good foraging weather

Regards, RAB
 

aseeryl 

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Rab

I have read ,mainly on this site, that they reorientate themselves the following day, perhaps one could close down the entrance for a short while?

He was talking about this trick being used prior to taking hives to the heather so perhaps that would account for them staying in the new hive in a new environment - I think this answers your point. I can't really move these.

I'm a bit risk averse, especially this late in the season, but I don't want to abandon this unless I have to.
 

Finman 

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Anyway, I was at the bee club at the weekend and one chap suggested an old trick for weak hives was to put it in the place of a "normal" hive for a day and collect foragers as they return. ?
Really stupid idea. What happens to the better hive?

Best way is to take emerging brood from the strong hive. - and of course to put laying queen into the hive.

That queenless hive does not need foragers but nurser bees.

How do you collect one day foragars? I cannot understand.

I have strengtened hives with foragers this way: Put extracted box of combs to the strong hive. Let it be couple of hours and then take it over 3 miles on the new hive. - So it does not succeed in same yard.
 

Poly Hive 

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it's a common trick and a useful one.

I use it quite often to keep my nucs in check and give a weaker one a boost.

Just swap them and leave them alone.

PH
 

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