* Environment * Bees Bees' tiny brains beat computers, study finds

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

Queens59 

Queen Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jun 8, 2010
Messages
2,374
Reaction score
0
Location
Dartmoor edge, uk
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
5...2 wooden National, 2 poly Nat & 1 poly nuc...bursting at the seams
Hee hee - I knew it...my bees are cleverer than me! Maths was never my strong point...questions like how to get from A-B in the quickest time etc made me run for the hills!
 

Monsieur Abeille 

Queen Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2010
Messages
2,985
Reaction score
2
Location
Exmoor
Hive Type
none
Number of Hives
None of my own
Harness the power in an organic SatNav. Perfect except for a few "slow down by this field of clover" instructions, or "I'm not going out in this weather"
 

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
25,902
Reaction score
377
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth

I would say that that writer's brains are not at the level of honeybee.

At least computer makes in few seconds the route where honeybee spends 30 minutes.

A honeybee is a stupid animal. When it has 20 hectares rape, it goes to nearest flower even if other bees have suck it empty. It does not know that on opposite edge of the flower fiels are full of nectar and it would get quickly the full load there.

Beekeeper is more stupid. Even if he knows what the bee does, BK put all hives in one site.

.
 

gavin 

Drone Bee
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Messages
1,331
Reaction score
0
Location
Tayside
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
about 70 and rising
That isn't right. When competition for the available nectar is high, bees will travel. For example spring-sown rape around here is only available here and there. Bees will often fly quite far into field and maximise the efficiency of foraging that way. Winter (autumn sown) rape around here is a superabundant resource when it comes. Bees usually land near the edge of the field as there is no need for them to fly further.

G.
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,747
Reaction score
165
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
Yes they may, but it is a well published fact that fields near forests have much better yield within (and I'm not sure which figure is oft quoted) about half a kilometre from the edge (it may be 1 km)of the forest. I am referring here to coffee crops in equatorial areas where these trends have been noted. Field beans in the UK may well be an example. OSR would not as it is reputedly 90% wind pollinated (when grown as a mono-crop, presumably)

The waggle dance from a particular bee will include a distance component, but whether any pattern as to increasing distance is useful is debatable. The flowers will secrete nectar over a period of a few days, so those visited yesterday may be a worth a visit tomorrow. Studying yields may lead to a conclusion that bees only fly as far as necessary (true) or perhaps that the nearest flowers are visited on multiple occasions. No real way to know, unless each are videod over a long period. That may not help the growers who already know the resulting yields of their crops.

Regards, RAB
 
Top