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Hivemaker. 

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Some fungicides also not looking good for bee's.

EXTRACT.
Here we describe a new phenomenon, entombed pollen, which is highly associated with increased colony mortality. Entombed pollen is sunken, capped cells amidst ‘‘normal”, uncapped cells of stored pollen, and some of the pollen contained within these cells is brick red in color. … the increased incidence of entombed pollen in reused wax comb suggests that there is a transmittable factor common to the phenomenon and colony mortality. In addition, there were elevated pesticide levels, notably of the fungicide chlorothalonil, in entombed pollen. The fungicide chlorothalonil. Chlorothalonil was found in 100% of the samples of entombed pollen, but only in 45.5% of samples of normal pollen

from: "Entombed Pollen": A new condition in honey bee colonies associated with increased risk of colony mortality. By Dennis vanEngelsdorp , et al

http://ento.psu.edu/pollinators/publications/Entombed
 

Bcrazy 

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Hivemaker
When we consider what the bees have to put up with. all the internal problems then comes along the beekeeper to disturb them again its no wonder they become a wee bit tetchy now and again, I now am beginning to believe that the losses of the queens or should I say the queens seemingly stop producing is connected in some way to this problem with the in fighting of the mucus fluid of sperm and the complete mixture after she has been mating with a number of drones. Its got to play some kind of problem with in the queens spermatheca, and what type of genetic makeup will she produce if this really is happening.
I still do not want to change my hobby.
Lets put it this way it can only get better.
 

Hivemaker. 

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Not seen any research that says homogenised honey bee drone sperm only ends up with the sperm from one drone,these killing all the rest.
 

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What I have seen it is an advantage to the colony that it has many drones sperm. In colony level the hive has hybrid power compared to narrow genetic material in queen's spermatecha.

The queen make so much mating flight that it gets enough sperm. It takes 2-3 days and as I have seen in my hives 1 day - 2 rainy day - fouth mating day.

'
What idea is the queen risk it self to make many mating flights that sperm fight and destroyes each othe. And where it has been said?

On another hand, Britain is an only country which has reported "poorly mated queens all the time". If we have cold and rainy weathers in Finland and queens cannot mate, then they are unmated. Poorly mated queens arise when days are unvague and rainy. That is not secret. I can look from thermometer are queens mated. They need several sunny 20C days to be mated. Very few make mating flights in the temp of 18C.
 

Hivemaker. 

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You tell me,because i don't have any problems with Queens mating either if the weather is good,if its not good i still don't have any problems.

Could be problems with entombed pollen and fugicides, though nothing to do with Queens mating as far as i can see.

Finman...
> What idea is the queen risk it self to make many mating flights that sperm fight and destroyes each othe. And where it has been said?

Think Bcrazy is talking about this..........below.

"Right after mating there is competition between sperm from different males.
http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/showthread.php?p=47057#post47057
 
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Bcrazy 

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Yes I am very concerned about this report that the seminal fluid can harm the sperm of other males.The implications are to drastic to consider. the strongest of the characteristics in the genetic makeup will take presidence over the weaker ones. But on saying this it has been established that once the sperm is in the spermatheca there is a substance that causes the action of the seminal fluid to cease. By that time the damage has been done.
Regards;
 

Hivemaker. 

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Not seen any reports yet on this hapening with homogenised semen from people like Cobey,Roger,Latshaw, ect,would of thought they may also have imformation about this,maybe, could be worth asking.
 
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m100 

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On another hand, Britain is an only country which has reported "poorly mated queens all the time". If we have cold and rainy weathers in Finland and queens cannot mate, then they are unmated. Poorly mated queens arise when days are unvague and rainy. That is not secret. I can look from thermometer are queens mated. They need several sunny 20C days to be mated. Very few make mating flights in the temp of 18C.
A quick look at http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/averages/ukmapavge.html would show you exactly why. In June We don't get temperatures of 20 deg C in a great many areas of the country particularly in the North. In July we might, but by August temperatures have started dropping. (the user interface there is crap, remember to make a selection and then click on the blue area above the selection criteria)

Bees have a much easier time in Finland
 
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Hivemaker. 

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this is the reply i have recieved from Joe.
Hi Pete.
I have not read the particular paper you referenced, but I have read some work on sperm competition. It is very interesting! I have not looked at sperm competition in honey bees directly. Indirectly, when looking at sperm samples for other work, all male lineages are represented, which does not rule out competition, but does suggest, that no one male has a distinct advantage.

Best regards,
Joe
 

Bcrazy 

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That last comment has some reassurance to it.
 

ian 

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Hi

If this report is correct what's the issue it would have been going on since year dot, Why suddenly a concern for the beekeeper.


Regards Ian
 
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Bcrazy 

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Hi Ian,
If this report is correct what's the issue it would have been going on since year dot,
But has it been going on for years. I think not.

See Sperm warefare hots up there is another report.
 
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ian 

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Hi

"But has it been going on for years. I think not."

I can't see there is anything in the reports that suggests this is a new phenomenon.

Regards Ian
 

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