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Eggs and UV illumination

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Hombre 

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A number of people have mentioned the difficulty of clearly seeing eggs in cells when the light is just not quite right. Occasionally the egg actually looks a bit like the glint of sun off a deep nectar surface. Doubtless my eyes are not yet trained to acquire them as fast as they should.

With the ready availability of 5mm UV LEDs, I have to ask if bee eggs flouresce under UV light, and If so, other than something else to drop, what are the perceived drawbacks, particularly if light conditions are less than ideal?
 

Heather 

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I have a special magnifier, like a clear bar (used in my residential home for book reading for partially sighted). I just lay it on the frame and they show up well. Any mag glass will help - but also use the sunlight at the correct angle shows up eggs ok.:)
 

Polyanwood 

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A pair of reading glasses from the pound shop also helped me.
 

jimbeekeeper 

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despite having 20:20 vision (and age on my side) it is still hard to see them eggs, due to light condtions and the mesh of the bee suit.
 

Hombre 

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Yes, that was a point that I had observed, the mesh has a visual capture effect that interferes slightly when attempting to get frames, varifocals and sun into the best alignment.

No one has actually yet been able to answer the question about the eggs fluorescing under UV or not. If illuminating with a very small UV source made the eggs stand out like white shirts at a disco (it's been a while) then would it be a useful bit of kit, for when the light wasn't as good as it might be or visual acuity not as keen, for whatever reason.

Here is a circuit diagram for a small device that can run efficiently on your effectively flat 1.5V cells with a very bright LED output - bright white or green are good too for other uses.
__________

I will be more than happy to draw and post a practical layout diagram if anyone is interested but needs assistance. Top of the battery in the diagram should be marked +V
:cheers2:
 

Finman 

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Sun light is harmfull to bees eggs. I suppose that UV lamp is harmfull to both beekeeper and bee eggs.

Never mind if you do not see eggs. Many cannot see queens.
 
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A number of people have mentioned the difficulty of clearly seeing eggs in cells when the light is just not quite right. Occasionally the egg actually looks a bit like the glint of sun off a deep nectar surface. Doubtless my eyes are not yet trained to acquire them as fast as they should.

With the ready availability of 5mm UV LEDs, I have to ask if bee eggs flouresce under UV light, and If so, other than something else to drop, what are the perceived drawbacks, particularly if light conditions are less than ideal?
An old post but not yet clearly answered.

I did get to see eggs more clearly with a 3 X pocket magnifier with very white LEDs... have one winging it way from Hong Kong at this very moment with a UV emitting LED, (used to check for forged currency) as an addition to 6 white LEDs.....................

To bee continued?:
nature-smiley-014:​
 

galileo 

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One of those cheapie (and small) white LED torches makes eggs unmissable. So yes, they do fluoresce, but you don't need to go all the way to hard UV wavelengths to get the effect - there's enough top end in a white LED to achieve it. I'd thought about a UV LED too, but with bees being able to see UV light very clearly, considered it might be a bit too much of a draw. I'd be most interested to hear results in due course, ican.
 

Vramin 

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I have actually bought a small UV torch, but haven't used it because I'm worried that it might either harm the eggs or the bees eyes. Decided that if I don't manage the see Q (my usual problem!) then seeing young larvae would suffice.

The torch is great at charging fluorescent stars on bedroom ceiling, but using it, even for a short period, hurts my eyes, hence my reluctance regarding my precious bees.
 

VEG 

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I use a small led torch and havent yet failed to see eggs in the cells if they are there.
 

Finman 

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Human cannot see UV light. How it happens with eggs? UV leds. Where are they used?

UV it is called over visible blue light and IR under visible red light

 
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itma 

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Human cannot see UV light. How it happens with eggs? UV leds. Where are they used?

That it is called over visible blue light and under visible red light
Finman, the point of concern was making eggs fluoresce (emit human-visible light) when illuminated with uv.

I'm going to try the led torch thing and see if it helps.
 

Anduril 

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You may find that the bees will be attracted to the uv LED and stop you looking for eggs. In Australia they have fluoro parties perhaps a way of finding your queen.
 

Finman 

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You may find that the bees will be attracted to the uv LED and stop you looking for eggs. In Australia they have fluoro parties perhaps a way of finding your queen.
Why? Full inspection or what?
You inspect and inspect and swarm has allready gone.

.
 

raddoc 

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Be careful with blue light.
There is an entity called Blue light toxicity and an association with macular degeneration.
 
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