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Edge jointing

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Drone Bee
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I'm having trouble finding timber wide enough to make up brood boxes, so considering joining narrower boards to make the width. Not done this before, the options seem to be biscuit, finger or 'glue' joints. I'll be using a router to do the cutting:

http://www.wealdentool.com/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Biscuit_Jointing_Set_138.html
http://www.wealdentool.com/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Adjustable_Set_146.html
http://www.wealdentool.com/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Glue_Joint_Parallel_139.html

The finger and 'glue' joints will result in a slight loss in final board width but look more substantial than the biscuit joint.

Anyone used anything like these and have any preferences or know any gotchas? Apart from the prices I mean.

Thanks
 

Poly Hive 

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I used biscuits for years to do precisely what you are wanting to do and they worked perfectly well. Remember you have the biscuits surface plus the face to face all glued up. Big area really.

PH
 

Mike a 

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I've always gone for biscuit joints then glue and screw to reinforce the joints. If I had the time and patience, a jig and blades I would opt for box joints.
 

DulwichGnome 

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If you use a biscuit jointer/router along the whole length of the boards and a strip of wood/ply it should give a stonger joint. Use Gorilla glue and it will never come apart (allegedly).

Mike.
 

oliver90owner 

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Saw from both sides. Slot will be central. Glue in a ply tongue. No need to run through if you want the tongue hidden. Wobble saw for really thick boards, but not needed for these sizes. There should very little loading on the joint when the item is finished (get the joints in the right place), so main requirement is to make it waterproof.

Regards, RAB
 

MJBee 

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I use 150mm wide boards and biscuit joints waterproof wood glue and sash clamp until all is set. As a commercial uses 2 and a bit widths I make sure the joins are offset and the finger joint corners provide an additional lock.:cheers2: Mike
 
T

Tom Bick 

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I think all the methods described will result in a strong joint basically it is better to increase the gluing surface so the finger joint may well be the strongest but I think if you invest in a biscuit jointer it may well open up more possibility's in other items you may want to make it is a very good tool to have.

If you glue the boards together with the end grain in alternate directions one board with the end grain curving up and the next board with the end grain curving down you will probably end up with a wide board that is more stable than if it was one single wide board.
 

Repwoc 

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Thanks guys. Looks like biscuit is the favourite, but I like the idea of the ply tongue and I can do that without expenditure on additional tools so think I will experiment with that for now.
 

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If you glue the boards together with the end grain in alternate directions one board with the end grain curving up and the next board with the end grain curving down you will probably end up with a wide board that is more stable than if it was one single wide board.
Thanks Tom good tip.
 
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