Economist article on varroa research

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Boston Bees 

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I am posting this against my better judgement, as (with only 6 hives in the study) I fear it is unscientific tosh, but here you go - The Economist does beekeeping! (There's a bonus obituary for you on the reverse)
 

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pargyle 

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I am posting this against my better judgement, as (with only 6 hives in the study) I fear it is unscientific tosh, but here you go - The Economist does beekeeping! (There's a bonus obituary for you on the reverse)
No that's an interesting observation ...not everything has to be backed by super science - sometimes just plain observation and basic thinking leads to more exact science. You only have to look where Derek Mitchell started his studies on bees and hives to understand that large oaks grow from small acorns ... give it time - perhaps someone else will pick it up and run with it.
 

Murox 

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I am posting this against my better judgement, as (with only 6 hives in the study) I fear it is unscientific tosh, but here you go - The Economist does beekeeping! (There's a bonus obituary for you on the reverse)
Interesting little read. Thanks for posting. As Pargyle suggested noteworthy observation which may lead to greater things.
 

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That study makes no sense.
80% out of mites are inside the cells, and cells are allways at same distances. Varroa is a quite runner in the hive, and it spreads where ever it wants.
 

coffindodger 

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The study does make sense. Whilst limited, it suggests a change in behaviour of the bees. It does not suggest that the behaviour controls, or even attempts to control varroa; that is another question entirely. The observation adds to the accumulating body of information on bee behaviour in adverse situations and may have implications for other challenges apart from varroa.
 

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