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Does anyone use lactic acid?

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louiseww 

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The chair of our local group (25 years experience) uses lactic acid diluted to a 15% sprayed lightly on the bees in early December.
Mine are still bringing in a little pollen on relatively warm days which suggests that they still have brood!
Oxalic seems to be undergoing a review at the moment so what does everyone think?
Thanks bee-smillie
 
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I have only come across lactic acid being sprayed early in the year. It doesn't do anything to varroa in cells so if there is brood, which is very likely in the UK in early December it will not be very effective and opening up a hive in December to spray the bees with anything seems very unwise. Lactic acid seems to be one of those treatments that had its supporters in the early years of varroa when people were trying all sorts of things but I would have thought it is not widely used anymore. However, you will always find a few beekeepers who practice something unique and will argue passionately in its defence. It helps keep this Forum going!

I am not aware of any review of oxalic - it is widely used.
 

MuswellMetro 

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The chair of our local group (25 years experience) uses lactic acid diluted to a 15% sprayed lightly on the bees in early December.
Mine are still bringing in a little pollen on relatively warm days which suggests that they still have brood!
Oxalic seems to be undergoing a review at the moment so what does everyone think?
Thanks bee-smillie
i use it ,but thats because i am very allergic to rhubarb,

lattic requires two applications, you have to break the cluster and lightly wet the bees

1lt for about a tenner from a big beehive suppliers treats about ten hives, a well know shop of theirs at windsor were selling out of date bottles in october, so be aware if you buy it that it is has a best befor date
 
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Finman 

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Lactic acid spraying was popular 15 years ago in Germany.
Now better methods have been developed.
Now spraying with 3% oxalic acid water (no sugar) is recommended, but not lactic acid.

I sprayed oxalic acid to some hives when I conditioned hives for winer. I shook bees to ground and sprayed 3% oxalic acid on them. When weather was cold and i sprayed water, it dropped bees' temperature so that they did not moved at all. I poured bees into hive and they woke up.

It seems that the weather should be very good if you spray the bees or at leats brood frames.
 

Vergilius 

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I have only come across lactic acid being sprayed early in the year. It doesn't do anything to varroa in cells so if there is brood, which is very likely in the UK in early December it will not be very effective and opening up a hive in December to spray the bees with anything seems very unwise. Lactic acid seems to be one of those treatments that had its supporters in the early years of varroa when people were trying all sorts of things but I would have thought it is not widely used anymore. However, you will always find a few beekeepers who practice something unique and will argue passionately in its defence. It helps keep this Forum going!

I am not aware of any review of oxalic - it is widely used.

So, essentially, it is a less effective treatment than oxalic.


Ben P
 

Finman 

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Oxalic acid trickling is the only method which is recommended to use in winter.

Others are recommended to use after taking honey from away. They can be used in spring too.

Folks do what they do and they do not mind if researchers have developed 10 years best methods. Daddy knows best.
 
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oliver90owner 

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Not long enough for them to be possibly adversely affected by repeated oxalic acid treatment!

Regards, RAB
 

Finman 

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How long you keep yours, Finman?
one year. The best couple queens I keep for rearing, but 3 years none. I know no reason to keep 3 years.

If I have a good queen, I take daughters from it but not next year. It will became internal breeding if you use the same mom because next year drones are virgins' brothers.
 

louiseww 

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Hi
I have got lactic acid so I can mix this up. When do you treat yours Muswell? I think my bees still have brood as they are collecting pollen. Still havn't made up my mind whether to use oxalic.
Thanks
Louise
 

MuswellMetro 

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Hi
I have got lactic acid so I can mix this up. When do you treat yours Muswell? I think my bees still have brood as they are collecting pollen. Still havn't made up my mind whether to use oxalic.
Thanks
Louise
first it is much easier with two people and much more hassle than oxalic, but i come up in red rash just handling a closed used bottle of oxalic

i do mine with lactic acid twice on one or two weeks either side of christmas

insulation off ,crown off, locate cluster, friend lifts out only clusters frames, zap one side,zap other, say repeated three to five times depending on how they are clustered cluster, crown back, fondant on , eke on, insulation back.....done

you have to have a fine spray not a squirty type and you mist the bees rather than drench them, they should have a silvermist on them


but as i said oxalic dribbling is easier ,less invasive, can be done by one person but again is recommended be done a low/zero brood and maymore have life shorting properties for queens, brood and winter workers than lactic but kills more mites
 
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Bee-Key-Pur 

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I use lactic acid when i'm working hard !!! and I use lots of oxalic acid to remove the rust spots off my decks.... :)
 
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