Can location make them aggressive.

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Deerless 

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I was wondering if a site can make colonies aggressive. Last season I had to move three colonies from my allotment as one by one they became very aggressive, following for considerable distance and eager to sting.
I know it wasn't a food issue as they had been on the garden, which is only 100 yds away and had returned approx 100lb each previously.
Neighbour on adjoining allotment placed docile colony on his plot late season, these have now become so aggressive that they have been moved to secluded location.
Has anyone had similar experience as I now think there could be a geographical cause.
 

oliver90owner 

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Small colonies are more docile than larger if the queen is that way disposed.

Supercedure can change the whole ball game.
 

MuswellMetro 

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I was wondering if a site can make colonies aggressive. Last season I had to move three colonies from my allotment as one by one they became very aggressive, following for considerable distance and eager to sting.
I know it wasn't a food issue as they had been on the garden, which is only 100 yds away and had returned approx 100lb each previously.
Neighbour on adjoining allotment placed docile colony on his plot late season, these have now become so aggressive that they have been moved to secluded location.
Has anyone had similar experience as I now think there could be a geographical cause.
Yes, it depends on the DNA of the local drones

i have one site that if i put any DOCILE bees with any trace of NZ Italian ancestry then the supersedure or AS Queens that cross with local drone go from Docile to aggressive followers in one generation

if i use buckfast stock in that apairy then, supercedure queens are not agressive until about the 5th generation
 
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AmyB 

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I would say yes very much so. Had a site in a small woodland, any bees moved there turned agressive. Moved them away and they calmed down again.
Many things could set a hive off in any location, badgers, deer, livestock, traffic noise, being dripped on by trees above......
 

MuswellMetro 

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I would say yes very much so. Had a site in a small woodland, any bees moved there turned agressive. Moved them away and they calmed down again.
Many things could set a hive off in any location, badgers, deer, livestock, traffic noise, being dripped on by trees above......
yes, had that to, A colony that hated the smell of horses, whenever a horse was in the next field, they turned nasty

I have also heard said that Carnolian drones can create aggressive Queen if they mate with Amm virgins...but as we have little of no AMM blood in bees in london, that just hearsay
 

sipa 

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Overstocking can make colonies aggressive, or should I say defensive.

If the natural food supply begins to fail then they will vigorously defend their stores against allcomers, that includes beekeepers.

So, not too many colonies in one location helps.
 

Deerless 

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As described, the same colonies 100yds away thrived on my garden but once on allotment, they became aggressive as did my Neighbours, so certainly not overcrowding. Three colonies on a 300sqm plot.
 

Smorning 

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I was wondering if a site can make colonies aggressive. Last season I had to move three colonies from my allotment as one by one they became very aggressive, following for considerable distance and eager to sting.
I know it wasn't a food issue as they had been on the garden, which is only 100 yds away and had returned approx 100lb each previously.
Neighbour on adjoining allotment placed docile colony on his plot late season, these have now become so aggressive that they have been moved to secluded location.
Has anyone had similar experience as I now think there could be a geographical cause.
I would have thought this was highly probable if they don't like it in the new location they can get a bit stroppy, they are like us after all. Maybe they will calm down but if not maybe they are telling you something, my advice is listen to the bees.
 

pargyle 

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No ... you're all wrong - it's the lack of ley lines. Get the dowsing rods out - you'll find that there's no crossing points.
 

Sean. 

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It can be undergorund or over ground power lines, weather, the are foraging on different things. Be in direct sun light and they are getting hot.
 

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