Can anyone identify please this has come up the wildflower area.

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Curly green finger's 

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I have just recently mowed the area and this and loads of forget-me-not, viola, are showing.
Also is it to late to move some of the forget me nots?
 

E&MBees 

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I have just recently mowed the area and this and loads of forget-me-not, viola, are showing.
Also is it to late to move some of the forget me nots?
I move forgot-me-nots now, the soil is still warm.
I did think it was Teasel, but on closer inspection could be a primula, either wild or garden escapee.
 

Monbees 

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I move forgot-me-nots now, the soil is still warm.
I did think it was Teasel, but on closer inspection could be a primula, either wild or garden escapee.
I think Teasel too, especially if the leaves are a bit spikey. In my experience Forget-me-nots will survive almost anything!
 

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I think Teasel too, especially if the leaves are a bit spikey. In my experience Forget-me-nots will survive almost anything!
My only other thought is Primula bulleyana, but the leaves are not serrated like the one I have.
 

RJC 

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- bees and pollinators love it when it flowers, and afterwards you can use the dry fruit it to comb the knap on your snooker table - as was traditionally done.
 

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Spiky leaves, definitely Teasel.
 

bingevader 

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Teasel for me too.
I love them, great for the bees and birds.
They do get rather big though, so if it's in a bad spot I would move it now. :)
 

Curly green finger's 

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- bees and pollinators love it when it flowers, and afterwards you can use the dry fruit it to comb the knap on your snooker table - as was traditionally done.
How did you know I had a snooker table? :).
Seems like the concensus is a teasel the wildflower area is only 20ft x20 ft and Ive counted 3 others of the plant in the photo but there smaller.
The big one is at the front, I will move it to the back as its right on the path edge.
Edit: and thanks I will move some of the forget me nots.
I've also planted crocus bulbs in the wildflower area for the girls hopefully they don't get swamped
 

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Teasel has quite a big tap root once established. Move it sooner rather than later.
 

Erichalfbee 

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Another vote for teasel
 

pargyle 

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It's DEFINITELY a teasel .... got loads in the garden ... grow up to over 6 feet tall if the soil is good. They are a lovely weed, they collect water in the crook of the leaves which insects love, the flowers are great for pollinators and the seed heads are a magnet for goldfinches.

They are a biennial plant though ... they develop the leaves and tap root first year and flower the second.
 

masterBK 

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I agree with enrico
Looks very like Evening primrose at this stage of the year. I have dozens of self seeded ones in my garden. Will have a closer look at them tomorrow and if they look the same will photo and upload pic.
 

pargyle 

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I agree with enrico
Looks very like Evening primrose at this stage of the year. I have dozens of self seeded ones in my garden. Will have a closer look at them tomorrow and if they look the same will photo and upload pic.
The teasel has a crinkly appearance to the leaves and a thicker central spine to the leaves that tapers to the end .. the Evening primrose is less crinkly and the leaf spine is a consistent width all the way up.

Evening Primrose first then Teasel second
 

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