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peteinwilts 

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Hi Guys

i am planning next years sites and have a delemma over one particular area.

The stream itself, is ok as it has huge amounts of wild mint growing alongside, but a bend in the stream and a low spot has created a boggy area.

It is damp in the summer and often soggy to the point of footsteps leave puddles in winter.

At the moment only a reedy type of grass grows with the odd patch of nettles on slightly higher spots.

It has been their for at least three hundred years (according to maps) and as you dig into the soil\peat it is very fiberous.

I may plant a handful of willows (any recomendations on species!?!), but would like other plants that like their feet wet and obviously also good for bees.

Must not be toxic for horses!!

Any ideas or recomendations would be great!

Cheers
Pete
 

David P 

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to plant it maybe, to accidentally drop its seeds as you walk past its anyones guess.
 

Hivemaker. 

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Looks about as illegal as ragwort,by the amount of it growing in the country,quick,call out the balsam police,sorry,different plant,thats cannabis.
 
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admin 

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Ragwort did not seem as bad this year around my way.
I think that must be down to the weather rather than councils/farmers keeping it down.
 

FenBee 

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You could consider planting Rose bay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium). We grow it in the flower beds at the front of our house, as it is very wet most of the year around and when in flower bees love it.

I have heard of it growing in ponds and seen it growing at the edge of lakes.
 

MJBee 

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Don't completely cover the boggy area with plants cos an area like that is a perfect source of water for your bees. I have a similar area where a natural spring comes to the surface and runs into the pond. In hot weather it is covered in water gathering bees.
:cheers2: Mike
 

ribblesbees 

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What about Water Figwort. Possibly Gypsywort and Purple Loosestrife, These all like damp/wet places but the latter two are not native and can be invasive (a bit like Himalayan Balsam).


bee-smillie
 

peteinwilts 

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Thanks all for the suggestions :hat:

I must confess I am not sure I have seen HB. I guess it is one of the plants you don't see unless you look for it!

RoseBay Willow herb... it is great!! I have some bordering the stream. I also have some in the front garden and will be collecting seeds later today! :)

Ribbles's suggestions sounds interesting!!... just got to find seeds!!
 
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If you haven't seen HB then you probably don't have it in your area. It is a tall plant with dark green leaves and pink flowers. The seed pods explode when ripe. Although it can be a good bee plant I do think it is irresponsible to plant it. If you do it will invade all the river banks downsteam of your patch and it will soon become obvious to everyone who introduced it - simply by walking back upstream until they reach where you are. It can damage banks and is not good for Ratty. See this story: http://www.escot-devon.co.uk/Water-Voles-Return-to-East-Devon’s-River-Tale/News-Article/

Rosebay Willow Herb is a different story. I know a beekeeper who tied it to the back of his Land Rover when the seeds were ready to fall and drove around the lanes to spread it a bit further.
 

wbchive 

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I may plant a handful of willows (any recomendations on species!?!)
F. N. Howes, in "Plants for Beekeeping" states,

"The male forms of the goat willow (salix caprea) with their large handsome catkins are probably as good as any for cultivation by the beekeeper."

Hope this helps,
Steve
 

Finman 

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Willow herb is not a wet land plant. It prefer airy soil.
Our best pastures are such where raspberry and willow herb grow mixed.

a bush Rhamnus franqula likes moist soil and produces nectar whole summer.
 
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